glycogen

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Related to hepatin: heparin, Heparin induced thrombocytopenia

gly·co·gen

 (glī′kə-jən)
n.
A polysaccharide, (C6H10O5)n, that is the main form of carbohydrate storage in animals and is found primarily in the liver and muscle tissue. It is readily converted to glucose as needed by the body to satisfy its energy needs. Also called animal starch.

gly′co·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

glycogen

(ˈɡlaɪkəʊdʒən; -dʒɛn)
n
(Biochemistry) a polysaccharide consisting of glucose units: the form in which carbohydrate is stored in the liver and muscles in man and animals. It can easily be hydrolysed to glucose. Also called: animal starch
glycogenic adj

gly•co•gen

(ˈglaɪ kə dʒən, -ˌdʒɛn)

n.
a polysaccharide, (C6H10O5)n, composed of glucose isomers, that is the principal carbohydrate stored by the animal body and is readily converted to glucose when needed for energy use.
[1855–60]

gly·co·gen

(glī′kə-jən)
A carbohydrate stored in the liver and muscles of animals that is converted to glucose for energy when glucose levels in the blood are depleted.

glycogen

A carbohydrate stored in the liver. It is produced from, but more complex than, glucose. See monosaccharides, polysaccharides.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glycogen - one form in which body fuel is stored; stored primarily in the liver and broken down into glucose when needed by the body
polyose, polysaccharide - any of a class of carbohydrates whose molecules contain chains of monosaccharide molecules
Translations
Glykogen
glycogeen

glycogen

[ˈglaɪkəʊdʒen] Nglicógeno m

glycogen

[ˈglaɪkəʊdʒən] nglicogeno

gly·co·gen

n. glucógeno, polisacárido usualmente almacenado en el hígado que se convierte en glucosa según lo necesite el organismo;
___ storage diseasehepatina, almacenamiento de glucógeno en el hígado.
References in periodicals archive ?
G1 phase is called the prophase of cell division, in which rRNA, mRNA, tRNA and ribosome were produced and hepatin was synthesized.
Perhaps cows stored more glycogen for hepatins because of consumption of a glucogenic diet prepartum in the HE and HEA groups, which resulted in higher plasma glucose during the first 3 weeks post-partum.