herald


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her·ald

 (hĕr′əld)
n.
1. A person who carries or proclaims important news; a messenger.
2. One that gives a sign or indication of something to come; a harbinger: The crocus is a herald of spring.
3. An official whose specialty is heraldry.
4.
a. An official formerly charged with making royal proclamations and bearing messages of state between sovereigns.
b. An official who formerly made proclamations and conveyed challenges at a tournament.
tr.v. her·ald·ed, her·ald·ing, her·alds
1. To proclaim, especially with enthusiasm; announce or acclaim: cheers that heralded the team's arrival.
2. To be a sign of; foreshadow: The discovery heralds a new era in drug treatment.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman, of Germanic origin; see koro- in Indo-European roots.]

herald

(ˈhɛrəld)
n
1.
a. a person who announces important news
b. (as modifier): herald angels.
2. often literary a forerunner; harbinger
3. (Heraldry) the intermediate rank of heraldic officer, between king-of-arms and pursuivant
4. (Historical Terms) (in the Middle Ages) an official at a tournament
vb (tr)
5. to announce publicly
6. to precede or usher in
[C14: from Old French herault, of Germanic origin; compare Old English here war; see wield]

her•ald

(ˈhɛr əld)

n.
1. a royal or official messenger, esp. one representing a monarch in an ambassadorial capacity during wartime.
2. a person or thing that precedes or comes before; forerunner; harbinger: the swallows, heralds of spring.
3. a person or thing that proclaims or announces.
4. (in the Middle Ages) an officer who arranged tournaments and other functions, announced challenges, marshaled combatants, etc.
5. an officer of a body concerned with armorial bearings, genealogies, etc., esp. an officer ranking between a king-of-arms and a pursuivant.
v.t.
6. to give tidings of; proclaim; publicize.
7. to signal the coming of; usher in.
[1300–50; Middle English herau(l)d < Old French herau(l)t < Frankish *heriwald=*heri army + *wald commander (see wield)]

herald

- Etymologically, a "leader of an army," from Germanic kharjaz, "army."
See also related terms for leader.

herald


Past participle: heralded
Gerund: heralding

Imperative
herald
herald
Present
I herald
you herald
he/she/it heralds
we herald
you herald
they herald
Preterite
I heralded
you heralded
he/she/it heralded
we heralded
you heralded
they heralded
Present Continuous
I am heralding
you are heralding
he/she/it is heralding
we are heralding
you are heralding
they are heralding
Present Perfect
I have heralded
you have heralded
he/she/it has heralded
we have heralded
you have heralded
they have heralded
Past Continuous
I was heralding
you were heralding
he/she/it was heralding
we were heralding
you were heralding
they were heralding
Past Perfect
I had heralded
you had heralded
he/she/it had heralded
we had heralded
you had heralded
they had heralded
Future
I will herald
you will herald
he/she/it will herald
we will herald
you will herald
they will herald
Future Perfect
I will have heralded
you will have heralded
he/she/it will have heralded
we will have heralded
you will have heralded
they will have heralded
Future Continuous
I will be heralding
you will be heralding
he/she/it will be heralding
we will be heralding
you will be heralding
they will be heralding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been heralding
you have been heralding
he/she/it has been heralding
we have been heralding
you have been heralding
they have been heralding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been heralding
you will have been heralding
he/she/it will have been heralding
we will have been heralding
you will have been heralding
they will have been heralding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been heralding
you had been heralding
he/she/it had been heralding
we had been heralding
you had been heralding
they had been heralding
Conditional
I would herald
you would herald
he/she/it would herald
we would herald
you would herald
they would herald
Past Conditional
I would have heralded
you would have heralded
he/she/it would have heralded
we would have heralded
you would have heralded
they would have heralded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.herald - (formal) a person who announces important newsherald - (formal) a person who announces important news; "the chieftain had a herald who announced his arrival with a trumpet"
formality - compliance with formal rules; "courtroom formality"
courier, messenger - a person who carries a message
2.herald - something that precedes and indicates the approach of something or someone
indicant, indication - something that serves to indicate or suggest; "an indication of foul play"; "indications of strain"; "symptoms are the prime indicants of disease"
Verb1.herald - foreshadow or presageherald - foreshadow or presage    
tell - let something be known; "Tell them that you will be late"
2.herald - praise vociferouslyherald - praise vociferously; "The critics hailed the young pianist as a new Rubinstein"
applaud - express approval of; "I applaud your efforts"
3.herald - greet enthusiastically or joyfully
greet, recognise, recognize - express greetings upon meeting someone

herald

verb
1. indicate, promise, precede, pave the way, usher in, harbinger, presage, portend, foretoken Their discovery could herald a cure for some forms of impotence.
2. announce, publish, advertise, proclaim, broadcast, trumpet, publicize Tonight's clash is being heralded as the match of the season.
noun
1. (Often literary) forerunner, sign, signal, indication, token, omen, precursor, harbinger I welcome the report as the herald of more freedom, not less.
2. messenger, courier, proclaimer, announcer, crier, town crier, bearer of tidings Jill hovered by the hearth while the herald delivered his news.

herald

noun
One that indicates or announces someone or something to come:
verb
To make known the presence or arrival of:
Translations
مُنادٍ، رسوليُعْلِن قُرْب، يُؤْذِنُ بمجيء
heroldzvěstovat
sendebudvarsle
boîberikallari; sendiboîi
heraldikaheraldinisheroldasšauklys
vēstītvēstnesisziņnesis
heroldzvestovať
habercihabercisi olmak

herald

[ˈherəld]
A. N (= messenger) → heraldo m (fig) → precursor(a) m/f
B. VT (fig) → anunciar

herald

[ˈhɛrəld]
n
(= person) → héraut m
(= precursor) → précurseur m
The festival is the herald of a new age → Le festival est le précurseur d'une nouvelle époque.
vtannoncer
to be heralded as sth (= trumpeted) → être salué(e) comme qch

herald

n
(Hist) → Herold m; (in newspaper titles) → Bote m
(fig)(Vor)bote m (geh); herald of springFrühlingsbote m
(Her) College of HeraldsHeroldsamt nt
vt arrival of summerankündigen, Vorbote(n) sein für; to herald (in) a new ageden Beginn eines neuen Zeitalters ankündigen; tonight’s game is being heralded as the match of the seasondas Spiel heute Abend wird als die Begegnung der Saison groß herausgebracht

herald

[ˈhɛrld]
1. naraldo (fig) → messaggero
2. vtannunciare

herald

(ˈherəld) noun
formerly, a person who carries and reads important messages and notices (eg from a king). The king sent out heralds to announce the new law.
verb
to announce or be a sign of. A sharp wind often heralds a storm.
heˈraldic (-ˈrӕl-) adjective
of heraldry.
ˈheraldry noun
the study of coats of arms, crests etc and of the history of the families who have the right to use them.
References in classic literature ?
For instance, assuming to myself the power of marshalling the aforesaid procession, I direct a trumpeter to send forth a blast loud enough to be heard from hence to China; and a herald, with world-pervading voice, to make proclamation for a certain class of mortals to take their places.
and herald, with thy voice of might, shout forth another summons that shall reach the old baronial castles of Europe, and the rudest cabin of our western wilderness
The dread alarum should make the earth quake to its centre, for the herald is about to address mankind with a summons to which even the purest mortal may be sensible of some faint responding echo in his breast.
Therefore let the trumpet, if possible, split its brazen throat with a louder note than ever, and the herald summon all mortals, who, from whatever cause, have lost, or never found, their proper places in the wold.
He then commanded his trumpet to sound a defiance to the challengers, and desired a herald to announce to them, that he should make no election, but was willing to encounter them in the order in which they pleased to advance against him.
De Grantmesnil's horse, which was young and violent, reared and plunged in the course of the career so as to disturb the rider's aim, and the stranger, declining to take the advantage which this accident afforded him, raised his lance, and passing his antagonist without touching him, wheeled his horse and rode back again to his own end of the lists, offering his antagonist, by a herald, the chance of a second encounter.
The Prince acquiesced, however, although his disposition was precisely of that kind which is apt to be obstinate upon trifles, and, assuming his throne, and being surrounded by his followers, gave signal to the heralds to proclaim the laws of the tournament, which were briefly as follows:
The heralds finished their proclamation with their usual cry of ``Largesse, largesse, gallant knights
The shouts of the multitude, together with the acclamations of the heralds, and the clangour of the trumpets, announced the triumph of the victors and the defeat of the vanquished.
When all this was done, and the army disciplined, and the herald Mouse had duly proclaimed war by challenging the Weasels, the newly chosen generals bound their heads with straws, that they might be more conspicuous to all their troops.
It is printed on both sides, of course; but in such large type that its entire contents could be put, in HERALD type, upon a single page of the HERALD--and there would still be room enough on the page for the ZEITUNG's "supplement" and some portion of the ZEITUNG's next day's contents.
I have also inserted portions of several letters written for the New York Tribune and the New York Herald.