herbary

herbary

(ˈhɜːbərɪ)
n, pl -ries
a herb garden
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Herbary

 a garden of herbs or vegetables, 1634; a collection of herbs or dried plants, 1591.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Being a brief exact Account of the chiefest Concernments of the whole Herbary Art; as also of the Excellency of our English Home Physick (London, 1677), 19.
This week, we particularly welcome The Herbary gifts in Troon, Scotland, London South Bank University, Leeds City Credit Union, Kates Kitchen catering in Bristol, The Pool media website and Which?
Hamel's jewelry and accessories can also be found at The Shop at Tower Hill in Boylston and Martha's Herbary in Pomfret, Connecticut.
Copied on the flyleaf of an herbary, it is an isolated work, altogether typical of the fragmentary remains of British sources.
On graduation she went straight into a sales director job in London with a Chinese import firm called Herbary.
With the experience she gained running Herbary, Yanhong decided to make the move into setting up her own business.
Gillian went for an acupuncture session with Dr Fu at the Chinese Herbary, in St David's Centre, in Cardiff.
A stop smoking acupuncture session at the Chinese Herbary costs pounds 25.
My GP said it was probably eczema or perhaps a fungal infection and a friend recommended I go to see a Chinese herbalist at The Herbary in Swindon, for an alternative remedy.
In 1653 his fame was such that he was offered, 'Upon a table, three hundred pieces of gold for his own Herbary' by Samuel Hartlib, a Prussian exile and friend of Marshal's who was settled in London and concerned with educational and social reform.