herdlike

herdlike

(ˈhɜːdˌlaɪk)
adj
resembling a herd
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The pattern of herdlike performance suggests a specific cause influencing manager success or failure that goes beyond standard portfolio decisions in terms of sector biases or investment style since, they write, "for every active manager that is overweight a sector, there is another who is underweight."
But what is truly deadly is this search for sameness, which has found body in the supreme leader's authoritative rhetoric and its demonstration in this herdlike, liturgical way.
"What we have observed is more herdlike behaviour in the markets, more herdlike behavior driving capital flows," Tharman said at the end of the IMF/World Bank spring meetings in Washington.
It is likely that political figures such as Silvio Berlusconi will continue to thwart Viroli's noble intentions because they can always promise to an unchurched, herdlike people the ease of material comforts and continual entertainment.
The future belongs to the rotting, groaning, lumbering, hungry, herdlike walking dead.
(220) In this vision of overconsumption literally gone amuck, Haslett ridicules the herdlike self-regard of a ruling class incapable of organizing itself in a crisis.
Although far more cautious than some of his contributors, he warns of a very likely scenario where a few defections (China comes to mind here) would soon generate "a herdlike momentum away from a depreciating dollar," a situation where "a sudden change in expectations could perhaps generate quite rapid change." The last time around, it took a war and the complete exhaustion of Britain to trigger such a total change.
Herdlike Behavior and Incentives for Contrarian Trading Strategies
They travel in large numbers, herdlike, clambering over obstacles, as if drawn by some invisible beacon.
In the review of On Liberty he quotes Mill's statements on China and conglomerated mediocrity and supplements them with his own images of biological evolution: the herdlike organization of bees and ants, of "Chinese anthills" forming in Europe represent the degeneration of the species (Herzen's emphasis, 11:74).
It may be technically accurate to say that urbanization allowed the freedom of greater anonymity and that certain barriers to personal autonomy, such as the influence of relatives and neighbors, have eroded, but look around: it's not as though herdlike behavior is in any danger of extinction.
Could these rambunctious reporters trying to squeeze some truth out of tricky White House officials be part of the same herdlike press corps that had dutifully let Bush get away with joking that his choice of reporters who could ask questions at a March 6 press conference was scripted?