hereditable

Related to hereditable: heritable

hereditable

(hɪˈrɛdɪtəbəl)
adj
1. (Biology) a less common word for heritable
2. (Law) a less common word for heritable
heˌreditaˈbility n
heˈreditably adv
Translations

hereditable

adj (Jur) → vererbbar; (Med also) → (ver)erblich
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
(7) Premarital screening often involves 1) taking a medical history with a special emphasis on family history of hereditable diseases and 2) performing a physical examination, which may include a pelvic examination in women and an examination of secondary sexual characteristics in men.
In addition, this study revealed a high hereditable component for both coronary artery and abdominal aorta calcification.[sup][9]
It is unclear if Spooner was influenced by this decision, but he attempted to provide Jefferson's philosophy with an effectual voice against hereditable compliance to outdated or unnatural laws.
The biochemical mechanism of evolution is distinct from the observations made by Darwin on hereditable variation and natural selection.
Paradoxically, other hereditable ophthalmic pathologies, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP), are far less common but their genetic profile has been much better characterized [5].
Notably, oxidative stress forms are hereditable, likely implying defined hereditable epigenetic changes.
Methylated DNA has various characteristics such as it is hereditable, stable and can convey abundant genetic information (Wolf et al., 1984; Cooper and Youssoufian, 1988; Laird, 2003).
Taylor 1841) (explaining that during the Anglo-Saxon period, elective sheriffs were replaced by appointed ones as kings gained more power); Stubbs, supra note 83, at 217-18 (Section 8 of the Articuli Super Cartas provided for election of sheriffs, except in counties where the office is hereditable or held in fee); cf.
That there is a hereditable component is clear but understanding how genetics impact on disease susceptibility, onset and progression is not yet clear.
Epigenetics is a hereditable process that affects the gene expression without changing the DNA sequence.
Very recent discoveries suggest that epigenetic modification might be hereditable, although most experts doubt that this can happen in mammals.
At the same time, scientists understood that some incurable and debilitating mental physical disorders were hereditable and for the sake of current public welfare and future generations measures were needed to prevent the perpetuation of such disorders into future gene pools.