hereditarily


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Related to hereditarily: Inheritably

he·red·i·tar·y

 (hə-rĕd′ĭ-tĕr′ē)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to heredity or inheritance.
b. Transmitted or capable of being transmitted genetically from parent to offspring: a hereditary disease.
2.
a. Passed down from one generation to the next: a hereditary prejudice.
b. Being such or possessed by reason of birth: a hereditary aristocracy.
3. Law
a. Capable of being inherited.
b. Descending from an ancestor to a legal heir; passing down by inheritance.
c. Having title or possession through inheritance.

[Middle English, from Latin hērēditārius, from hērēditās, inheritance; see heredity.]

he·red′i·tar′i·ly (-târ′ə-lē) adv.
he·red′i·tar′i·ness n.
References in classic literature ?
Nevertheless, it cannot be denied, that upon the whole they are hereditarily entitled to en bon point.
A short, stout, ruddy young fellow, very pugnacious concerning whales, who somehow seemed to think that the great Leviathans had personally and hereditarily affronted him; and therefore it was a sort of point of honor with him, to destroy them whenever encountered.
-- Inasmuch as peculiarities often appear under domestication in one sex and become hereditarily attached to that sex, the same fact probably occurs under nature, and if so, natural selection will be able to modify one sex in its functional relations to the other sex, or in relation to wholly different habits of life in the two sexes, as is sometimes the case with insects.
Moreover, it has been assumed that insulin signaling may share to advancement of ASD in hereditarily vulnerable subjects via triggering of PI3K/T or pathway in neurons.
(169) This was combined with the quasi-science of eugenics, which helped transform the familiar discourses of bigotry and nativism into biological "fact." Eugenics recast mentally ill and disabled citizens from community outsiders into long-term societal dangers by classifying them as hereditarily unfit.
The conquered were called untouchables and relegated to the bottom ranks, and were hereditarily delegated to all the most distasteful tasks, such as leather tanning and the removal of "night soil" (human excrement) from the houses of the other castes.
It was also observed that prolonging anticoagulant treatment in patients who hereditarily carried a high risk of thrombophilia did not provide advantage in terms of recurrence of thrombosis or development of complications.
Increased thrombotic risk associated with the hereditarily thrombophilic conditions such as F2 G20210A mutation and obstetric complications suggest a cause and effect relationship between former and latter.
The challenges from using these substances are that they are environmentally hazardous due to their toxicity and lethality to living beings/organs, even as they also exhibit ability to cause hereditarily inheritable health conditions [15, 37-39].
It is a main maker of hereditarily designed Genetic Engineering (GE) seed and Roundup, a glyph satisfy based herbicide.
Arthur Guett, the Reich Interior Ministry's public health director described the "supreme duty of the nation state to grant life and livelihood only to the healthy and hereditarily sound portion of the people." (21) In occupied Poland the Nazi governor sought to prevent transmission of tuberculosis by executing infected Poles.
(4) Such a formulation of the permissible grounds for punishment (that is, for extraction of payment) would prima facie authorize imposing a hereditarily transmitted debt burden upon the human race for an as-yet undischarged (and undischargeable) ancestral sin.