hereditary


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he·red·i·tar·y

 (hə-rĕd′ĭ-tĕr′ē)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to heredity or inheritance.
b. Transmitted or capable of being transmitted genetically from parent to offspring: a hereditary disease.
2.
a. Passed down from one generation to the next: a hereditary prejudice.
b. Being such or possessed by reason of birth: a hereditary aristocracy.
3. Law
a. Capable of being inherited.
b. Descending from an ancestor to a legal heir; passing down by inheritance.
c. Having title or possession through inheritance.

[Middle English, from Latin hērēditārius, from hērēditās, inheritance; see heredity.]

he·red′i·tar′i·ly (-târ′ə-lē) adv.
he·red′i·tar′i·ness n.

hereditary

(hɪˈrɛdɪtərɪ; -trɪ)
adj
1. (Biology) of, relating to, or denoting factors that can be transmitted genetically from one generation to another
2. (Law) law
a. descending or capable of descending to succeeding generations by inheritance
b. transmitted or transmissible according to established rules of descent
3. derived from one's ancestors; traditional: hereditary feuds.
4. (Mathematics) maths logic
a. (of a set) containing all those elements which have a given relation to any element of the set
b. (of a property) transferred by the given relation, so that if x has the property P and xRy, then y also has the property P
heˈreditarily adv
heˈreditariness n

he•red•i•tar•y

(həˈrɛd ɪˌtɛr i)

adj.
1. passing, or capable of passing, naturally from parent to offspring through the genes.
2. of or pertaining to inheritance or heredity.
3. existing by reason of feelings or opinions held by predecessors; ancestral: a hereditary enemy.
4. Law.
a. descending by inheritance.
b. transmitted or transmissible in the line of descent by force of law.
c. holding title, rights, etc., by inheritance: a hereditary proprietor.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin hērēditārius=hērēdit(ās) (see heredity) + -ārius -ary]
he•red`i•tar′i•ly (-ˈtɛər ə li) adv.
he•red′i•tar`i•ness, n.
syn: See innate.

he·red·i·tar·y

(hə-rĕd′ĭ-tĕr′ē)
Passed or capable of being passed from parent to offspring by means of genes: a hereditary trait.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.hereditary - occurring among members of a family usually by heredity; "an inherited disease"; "familial traits"; "genetically transmitted features"
heritable, inheritable - capable of being inherited; "inheritable traits such as eye color"; "an inheritable title"
2.hereditary - inherited or inheritable by established rules (usually legal rules) of descenthereditary - inherited or inheritable by established rules (usually legal rules) of descent; "ancestral home"; "ancestral lore"; "hereditary monarchy"; "patrimonial estate"; "transmissible tradition"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
heritable, inheritable - capable of being inherited; "inheritable traits such as eye color"; "an inheritable title"

hereditary

adjective
1. genetic, inborn, inbred, transmissible, inheritable In men, hair loss is hereditary.

hereditary

adjective
1. Of or from one's ancestors:
2. Possessed at birth:
Translations
dědičný
arvelig
perinnöllinen
nasljedan
örökletes
arf-/ættgengur
遺伝的な
유전성의
dedičný
ärftlig
เป็นกรรมพันธุ์
di truyền

hereditary

[hɪˈredɪtərɪ] ADJhereditario
hereditary diseaseenfermedad f hereditaria

hereditary

[hɪˈrɛdɪtəri] adj [disease] → héréditaire

hereditary

adj factor, characteristicerblich, angeboren; ruler, title, position, righterblich; hereditary disease or illnessErbkrankheit f, → erbliche Krankheit; hereditary peer Peer, der seine Peerswürde geerbt hat; hereditary monarchErbmonarch(in) m(f)

hereditary

[hɪˈrɛdɪtrɪ] adjereditario/a

heredity

(həˈredəti) noun
the passing on of qualities (eg appearance, intelligence) from parents to children.
heˈreditary adjective
(able to be) passed on in this way. Is musical ability hereditary?

hereditary

وِرَاثِيّ dědičný arvelig erblich κληρονομικός hereditario perinnöllinen héréditaire nasljedan ereditario 遺伝的な 유전성의 erfelijk arvelig dziedziczny hereditário наследственный ärftlig เป็นกรรมพันธุ์ kalıtsal di truyền 世袭的

he·red·i·tar·y

a. hereditario-a; que se trasmite por herencia.

hereditary

adj hereditario
References in classic literature ?
This, then, is one species of monarchical government in which the kingly power is in a general for life; and is sometimes hereditary, sometimes elective: besides, there is also another, which is to be met with among some of the barbarians, in which the kings are invested with powers nearly equal to a tyranny, yet are, in some respects, bound by the laws and the customs of their country; for as the barbarians are by nature more prone to slavery than the Greeks, and those in Asia more than those in Europe, they endure without murmuring a despotic government; for this reason their governments are tyrannies; but yet not liable to be overthrown, as being customary and according to law.
For those who were at first of benefit to mankind, either in arts or arms, or by collecting them into civil society, or procuring them an establishment, became the kings of a willing people, and established an hereditary monarchy.
Principalities are either hereditary, in which the family has been long established; or they are new.
The new are either entirely new, as was Milan to Francesco Sforza, or they are, as it were, members annexed to the hereditary state of the prince who has acquired them, as was the kingdom of Naples to that of the King of Spain.
The same title has been bestowed on Venice, where absolute power over the great body of the people is exercised, in the most absolute manner, by a small body of hereditary nobles.
Hence, probably, urged by a fixed and hereditary instinct that the shore is its place of safety, whatever the emergency may be, it there takes refuge.
With domesticated animals we are accustomed to see new mental habits or instincts acquired or rendered hereditary; but with animals in a state of nature, it must always be most difficult to discover instances of acquired hereditary knowledge.
He is then immediately taken from his proud yet sorrowing parents and adopted by some childless Equilateral, who is bound by oath never to permit the child henceforth to enter his former home or so much as to look upon his relations again, for fear lest the freshly developed organism may, by force of unconscious imitation, fall back again into his hereditary level.
It treasured itself up, too, in the half-open till, where there still lingered a base sixpence, worth neither more nor less than the hereditary pride which had here been put to shame.
What are the Duke of Dunder's hereditary towns and hamlets but Fast-Fish?
The hereditary dominions of the Emperor of Germany contain a great extent of fertile, cultivated, and populous territory, a large proportion of which is situated in mild and luxuriant climates.
It was difficult to realize that they had gone; down through ages of darkness, cruelty, and ignorance, until their hereditary instincts of culture and humanitarianism had risen ascendant once more in the final composite race which now is dominant upon Mars.