heresthetic

heresthetic

(ˌhɛrəsˈθɛtɪk)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a political strategy by which a person or group sets or manipulates the context and structure of a decision-making process in order to win or be more likely to win
[C20: coined, originally in the form heresthetics, by the US political scientist William Riker (1921–93), from Greek hairein to choose]
ˌheresˈthetical adj
heresthetician n
References in periodicals archive ?
When one of the most innovative political scientists, William H Riker, coined the term heresthetic in his pedagogical book The Art of Political Manipulation in 1986, who would know that, Imran Khan, the then shining cricket star, would precisely fall under his term in over three decades' time.
In the realm of presidential studies, the "heresthetic" approach poses rational choice as delivering "simplicity, clarity, logical rigor, and deductive power," while alternative approaches are portrayed as backward particularists who "weigh the presidency field down ...
How They Sometimes Become Winners): William Riker's Heresthetic, 1
The Chiefs functional heresthetic authority at conference may be limited, however, at least in modern times.
* Proposes William Riker's heresthetic, or "structuring the world so you can win," as a strategizing method
the term "heresthetic" to refer to "the strategy value of
Carsey, borrowing from William Riker ("Heresthetic and Rhetoric in the Spatial Model," in James M.
Consequently, in what the rational choice theorist William Riker (1993) called a "heresthetic" (or agenda-manipulating) move and what media experts call "priming" (Iyengar and Kinder 1987), the parties emphasized their differences on free trade and took common positions on the place of Quebec in Canada.
The case study is of Federalist and Antifederalist leaders' use of persuasion and maneuver, here termed rhetoric and "heresthetic." The latter is a coined word meaning "the art of setting up situations" by employing sentences with strategic value (9).
37) that "[f]raming the issue--determining types and levels of managerial discretion and relation to objectives--is, thus, crucial to strategic public management." Other studies of effective bureaucratic leadership (e.g., Behn 1991; Caro 1974; Doig and Hargrove 1987; and Lewis 1980) likewise suggest that at least some leaders are capable of what has also been called "setting the agenda," "defining the problem," "setting the terms of the debate," and engaging in "heresthetic" activities (to use the term introduced in Riker 1983; see also Riker 1984; 1986; 1990).
(11) Accordingly, presidential definition resembles what William Riker calls heresthetic: "the art of structuring the world so you can win." (12) Whether the art is practiced consciously or instinctively does not matter.
Riker's (1983, 1986) now-classic theory of heresthetic sheds light on the dynamics of divided government.