heresthetic

(redirected from heresthetical)

heresthetic

(ˌhɛrəsˈθɛtɪk)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a political strategy by which a person or group sets or manipulates the context and structure of a decision-making process in order to win or be more likely to win
[C20: coined, originally in the form heresthetics, by the US political scientist William Riker (1921–93), from Greek hairein to choose]
ˌheresˈthetical adj
heresthetician n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
They are only interested to play heresthetical defence to destroy the opportunities for their challengers to halt any chances of their winnings.
But it is the losers, the out-of-power aspirants, who are more keen to play a heresthetical offensive in inventing new dimensions of political conflicts and controversies.
Like Peel, Thatcher and Blair, who infiltrated their political agendas in perpetuating conflicts in the British politics in order to attain their desired results, Imran Khan can be seen as the Pakistani version of heresthetical politician, nonetheless the difference between Imran and those British leaders is that, they had accomplished their optimal points whilst playing as herestheticians, and Imran is still on the march to get his one.
Here come the heresthetical device into play to divide the majority with a new alternative: one that he previously expected to win.
Black et al., Trying to Get What You Want: Heresthetical Maneuvering and U.S.
Our theory is akin to Riker's theory of "heresthetics," a word Riker created from the Greek root meaning "choosing or electing." (77) A heresthetical maneuver involves an actor who sets the agenda by choosing a question strategically to generate supportive majority coalitions for a particular outcome, even when the majority may not seem supportive when the discussion is framed on another dimension.
(87.) See Lee Epstein & Olga Shvetsova, Heresthetical Maneuvering on the US Supreme Court, 14 J.
This can presumably be done through public and private speech making (see, e.g., Doig and Hargrove [1987] on David Lilienthal at the TVA), through various rhetorical and heresthetical tools (as described by Riker [1986]), through taking advantage of accidents and other unplanned events (e.g., the widely publicized cases of food and pharmaceutical poisoning that ultimately enhanced the powers of the Food and Drug Administration--see Quirk [1980, 192-96]), and a variety of other techniques.
This article looks at the juxtaposed conclusions reached in the literature and argues that the quantitative literature reaches its counterintuitive conclusions because it overlooks a very potent type of influence--the definition of alternatives or "heresthetical" influence.(6)
All of these tactics can be conceptualized as falling into one of two categories: rhetorical or heresthetical persuasion.(56)
Heresthetical influence or persuasion, on the other hand, involves "structuring the world so you can win."(58) Heresthetic influence occurs when a president tries to recast the debate, to convince members of Congress as a collective that the issue is structured in such away that their interests and his interests are one and the same.
Heresthetical influence has been largely neglected in the presidency literature, and it is this neglect that leads many presidency scholars to reach the counterintuitive conclusion that presidents influence the legislative process only "at the margins." This article will examine Ronald Reagan's successful use of heresthetical influence with respect to the Reconciliation Budget of 1981 and will explore Richard Nixon's use of both rhetorical and heresthetical influence in the 92d House of Representatives.