heresthetic

(redirected from heresthetician)

heresthetic

(ˌhɛrəsˈθɛtɪk)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a political strategy by which a person or group sets or manipulates the context and structure of a decision-making process in order to win or be more likely to win
[C20: coined, originally in the form heresthetics, by the US political scientist William Riker (1921–93), from Greek hairein to choose]
ˌheresˈthetical adj
heresthetician n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
It is well said that defeat is the mother of all inventions and with Imran's persistent losing streak against his archrivals gave birth to a new Imran: from an illusionary politician who was living in the bubble of his old fandom to a heresthetician who now comprehends the dynamics of being a clever politician as defined by Riker.
Like Peel, Thatcher and Blair, who infiltrated their political agendas in perpetuating conflicts in the British politics in order to attain their desired results, Imran Khan can be seen as the Pakistani version of heresthetical politician, nonetheless the difference between Imran and those British leaders is that, they had accomplished their optimal points whilst playing as herestheticians, and Imran is still on the march to get his one.
Apart from that, if we gaze at his party's affairs, Khan is no different from any British herestheticians and had sequentially driven out his most of critics from his party who dared to come in his way and he would continue to do so in the future.
9) referred to this as heresthetics: "the art of setting up situations, composing the alternatives among which political actors must choose, in such a way that even those who do not wish to do so are compelled by the structure of the situation to support the heresthetician's purpose." This involves making compromises in order to achieve most of one's objectives and being persistent so as to solidify beliefs.
(25) Riker's "heresthetician" tries to place certain issues at the front of the policy agenda by introducing new ideas and dimensions of debate, often with clever or shrewd rhetoric.
People are crucial in heresthetic because their needs drive the process of heresthetic to its ultimate goal in any given situation, their values and tastes define the lengths to which they will go, and their individual strengths and limitations present to themselves and to other herestheticians some of the dimensions of the heresthetic problem to be solved.
One quality that makes herestheticians effective is their ability to invent other and better alternatives even when given many poor choices.