hermetist


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hermetist

(ˈhɜːmɪˌtɪst)
n
(Alternative Belief Systems) a believer in or expounder of hermetism
References in periodicals archive ?
Regarding Pico, Yates tried to make him into a hermetist and a student of Ficino.
In his evaluation of Ibn Sar'in's oeuvre, Vincent Cornell characterizes this Andalusian "intellectual mystic" as an "Islamic Hermetist," but only after offering a seven-point working definition of medieval Islamic Hermetism.
Hanegraaff and Bouthoorn's volume examines the little-known Italian poet and hermetist Ludovico Lazzarelli, as well as his eccentric mentor, the prophet and provocateur Giovanni "Mercurio" da Correggio.
Coincidentally, each was working on a project regarding the fascinating 15th-century Italian Christian hermetist Ludovico Lazzarelli.
Far from practicing astral magic, Lazarelli was a deeply pious Christian Hermetist, who is of central importance in understanding Hermeticism precisely because he does not fit Yates's and, in this case, Walker's overemphasis on the magical and modernist-progressive dimension of Renaissance Hermeticism (Lodovico Lazzarelli, 1447-1500: The Hermetic Writings and Related Documents [Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005], introduction).
Frances Yates considered Lazzarelli the most enthusiastic and exaggerated hermetist when she incorporated him into her work on Giordano Bruno.
one cannot go wrong in revering his opinion."(74) (Foix de Candale, interestingly, was a mathematician as well as a Christian Hermetist: of his five published works, "three are editions and translations of the Pimander .
Transcendence of the sort practiced by Plotinus and early Christianera Hermetists was revived and given new impetus by fifteenth-century philosopher Marsilio Ficino with his Latin translations of and commentaries on those authors.
All in all we could state that the concept of Christian infinity, conceived to frame the mystery of the Trinity, and employing, in its explicative form, the boons of Greek philosophy, was surrounded in the Greco-Roman world by some other, and complementary, infinitist solution to the problem of world unity: while Hermetists' destiny was to stir the imagination of the pioneers of modern mechanics, the Gnostics probably assisted, by their desperate craving for the other world, to underpin the new Western conception of Romantic desire and love (de Rougemont 1966:78-113).
Libavius is well known to historians of chemistry, primarily through the work of Owen Hannaway, who portrayed the pious schoolmaster as earnestly attempting to wrest the domain of chemistry from wild-eyed and epistemologically dangerous Hermetists and Paracelsians, and, in the process, transformed chemistry into a teachable discipline.
It was just such a period, the declining centuries of Greco-Roman civilization, that bred the original euhemerists, Hermetists, alchemists, and theurgists, as well as a swarm of other turbid irrationalities not very different from many we see around us today.
To this day, modern-day Druids, the Ancient Order of Druid Hermetists, assemble at Stonehenge on a Midsummer's Eve and keep a watch to see the sun rise over the Sunstone.