hermetist


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hermetist

(ˈhɜːmɪˌtɪst)
n
(Alternative Belief Systems) a believer in or expounder of hermetism
References in periodicals archive ?
Regarding Pico, Yates tried to make him into a hermetist and a student of Ficino.
In his evaluation of Ibn Sar'in's oeuvre, Vincent Cornell characterizes this Andalusian "intellectual mystic" as an "Islamic Hermetist," but only after offering a seven-point working definition of medieval Islamic Hermetism.
Hanegraaff and Bouthoorn's volume examines the little-known Italian poet and hermetist Ludovico Lazzarelli, as well as his eccentric mentor, the prophet and provocateur Giovanni "Mercurio" da Correggio.
Coincidentally, each was working on a project regarding the fascinating 15th-century Italian Christian hermetist Ludovico Lazzarelli.
Far from practicing astral magic, Lazarelli was a deeply pious Christian Hermetist, who is of central importance in understanding Hermeticism precisely because he does not fit Yates's and, in this case, Walker's overemphasis on the magical and modernist-progressive dimension of Renaissance Hermeticism (Lodovico Lazzarelli, 1447-1500: The Hermetic Writings and Related Documents [Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005], introduction).
Frances Yates considered Lazzarelli the most enthusiastic and exaggerated hermetist when she incorporated him into her work on Giordano Bruno.
John Dee, the English Hermetist, mathematician and magus, when in 1659 he published a large part of Dee's "spiritual diaries.
Libavius is well known to historians of chemistry, primarily through the work of Owen Hannaway, who portrayed the pious schoolmaster as earnestly attempting to wrest the domain of chemistry from wild-eyed and epistemologically dangerous Hermetists and Paracelsians, and, in the process, transformed chemistry into a teachable discipline.
It was just such a period, the declining centuries of Greco-Roman civilization, that bred the original euhemerists, Hermetists, alchemists, and theurgists, as well as a swarm of other turbid irrationalities not very different from many we see around us today.
To this day, modern-day Druids, the Ancient Order of Druid Hermetists, assemble at Stonehenge on a Midsummer's Eve and keep a watch to see the sun rise over the Sunstone.
Just as Lactantius reached out to embrace and educate Neoplatonists and Hermetists, so Constantine, the would-be engineer of a Roman empire founded on a concept of religious concord that divorced civic loyalty from public religious observance, could "profess unequivocally his own belief in the One God," while also allowing liberty to the followers of the temple cults (138).
He discerns three groups: (1) the enthusiasts, above all the hermetists, who took the Fama verbatim and regarded the society as a reality; (2) the moderate defenders, who saw the actual matter not in the brotherhood but in the announcement of Paracelsian philosophy; and (3) the opponents and detractors, for whom the brotherhood was a "Lucianic" tale (88).