hermitism

Related to hermitism: Hermetism, hermetic, hermitage

hermitism

(ˈhɜːmɪˌtɪzəm) or

hermitry

n
the act of living as a hermit

hermitism

the practice of retiring from society and living in solitude, based upon a variety of motives, including religious. Also called hermitry, hermitship.hermitic, hermitical, adj.
See also: Behavior
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References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, Ibn Tufayl avows, social stability is not sufficient to secure happiness in the afterlife, and his narrative ends with Hayy and Absal returning to the uninhabited island to resume their hermitism where they "served God until man's certain fate overtook them".
To Barthes's ears, the word "idiorrhythmy" sounded almost like a pleonasm, since the dimension of "idios" was already prescribed in the notion of rhythm as rhuthmos, which for him meant: "interstices, fleetingness of codes, the way the subject inserts himself into the social (or natural) code." (56) Just as rhuthmos is at once part of the flow and that which resists the flow, idiorrhythmy provides an "idyllic" social model, half way between total isolation (hermitism) and mandated collectivity (cenobitism).
When Bellamy described the hero of an unfinished story that year, he was really describing himself: "Cured once and for all of Hermitism and self-absorption, he plunges with enthusiasm, with tremendous earnestness into the study of social conditions and develops nationalism" (qtd Thomas 168).
Hincmar of Rheims, Benedict of Anaiane, Cluny, the monastic explosion of the eleventh century, the Peace of God and Truce of God, the crusades, the movement toward hermitism, Romuald, the Cistercians, the Reform Papacy and Gregorian Reform (Leo IX, Humberto, Peter Damien, Hildebrand), the movement to communal life as canons at churches, are all discussed.