heroic verse


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Related to heroic verse: heroic poetry, heroic stanza

heroic verse

n.
One of several verse forms traditionally used in epic and dramatic poetry, especially:
a. The dactylic hexameter in Greek and Latin.
b. The iambic pentameter in English.
c. The alexandrine in French. In all senses also called heroic meter.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

heroic verse

n
(Poetry) prosody a type of verse suitable for epic or heroic subjects, such as the classical hexameter, the French Alexandrine, or the English iambic pentameter
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hero′ic verse′


n.
a form of verse adapted to the treatment of heroic or exalted themes: in classical poetry, dactylic hexameter; in English and German, iambic pentameter; and in French, the Alexandrine.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.heroic verse - a verse form suited to the treatment of heroic or elevated themes; dactylic hexameter or iambic pentameter
epic, epic poem, heroic poem, epos - a long narrative poem telling of a hero's deeds
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

heroic verse

n (Poet) → heroischer Vers
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
"These three books," said the curate, "are the best that have been written in Castilian in heroic verse, and they may compare with the most famous of Italy; let them be preserved as the richest treasures of poetry that Spain possesses."
Less obstinate, and even less dangerous combats, have been described in good heroic verse; but that of Gurth and the Miller must remain unsung, for want of a sacred poet to do justice to its eventful progress.
Imitation is only a kind of play or sport, and the tragic poets, whether they write in iambic or in Heroic verse, are imitators in the highest degree?
According to some religious Anglo-Saxons, the existence and popularity of heroic verse exposed the newly converted people to spiritual danger.
Tolkien writes a "sequel" to what is remembered as the finest example of Old English heroic verse, gives it a fitting title for its epic context, then ironically undercuts both of these by focusing on the inglorious task of Tida and Totta.
Wickert realizes the muscularity and the fluidity of Tasso's heroic verse best when he relaxes slightly his efforts to match Tasso's syntax, as in his chilling rendering of the epic simile that describes Rinaldo breaking into the barricaded Temple of Solomon: "Even as a ravening wolf in darkening air / comes prowling round a sheepfold bolted fast, / his maw greedy and gaunt, his hunger and care / by inborn wrath and hate matched and surpassed.
in heroic verse, of love, betrayal, pain and guilt, life over death
Dryden was the first to attribute Milton's sublime style to a rhetorical technique (Jensen 111) and, in "The Author's apology For Heroic Poetry and Poetic License" which prefaced "The State of Innocence," his own operatic vision of Paradise Lost, Dryden took on the role of critic when he judged Milton's heroic verse. As Dryden explained: "No man will disagree from another's judgment concerning the dignity of style in heroic poetry; but all reasonable men will conclude it necessary that sublime subjects ought to be adorned with the sublimest, and consequently often, with the most figurative expressions" (118).
By the time Brunichildis was killed in 613, history had already begun to evolve into legend, though the paucity of surviving German heroic verse until the Hildebrandslied in the eleventh century has obliged scholars to trace several lost stages of its emergence from Burgundian to Frankish, Bavarian, and Austrian versions.
The Aeneid loses its sacred aura and is demystified at the same time it remains a model of heroic verse. The epic inspires reflection on the design of the novel as it had developed from d'Urfe to Scudery, such that the new genre remains a variant of the epic (318).
However, the present volume clearly takes issue with this implicit devaluation of the Evangelienbuch: whereas here even the Hildebrandslied is featured only as part of a wider discussion of heroic verse, Otfrid von Weissenburg is the only writer to have an entire contribution devoted to him.
Here the curse of the fall and not the world is "too much with us." Heroic verse, he says, is "music / for taxiing to take-off; for cremation," life and death, but his commitment was to heroic verse from his first great poem, Genesis, so his suffering is great: "How is it tuned, how can it be un- / tuned, with lithium, this harp of nerves?