heroinism


Also found in: Medical.
Related to heroinism: heroism

her·o·in·ism

 (hĕr′ō-ĭ-nĭz′əm)
n.
Addiction to heroin.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

heroinism

(ˈhɛrəʊɪnˌɪzəm)
n
(Recreational Drugs) drugs an addiction to heroin
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

heroinism

n. heroinismo, heroinomanía, adicción a la heroína.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
But around age fifteen Catherine's adolescent hormones, prodded by social scripts on the acquisition of femininity, motivate her to acquire some of the accoutrements of aspiring heroinism and to abandon some of her unsavory tomboy ways.
Treatment of heroinism with acupuncture at points of the Du Channel.
Wang, "Treatment of heroinism with acupuncture at points of the Du Channel," Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine, vol.
Each of the first three chapters is devoted to one of the three writers and each chapter is divided into similar sections: 'Literary persona'; 'Heroinism' (a word used by Johnstone in Clan-Albin)-, 'Parents and education'; 'Location'; and 'Cul-de-sac'.
Steven Neale's genre-based film theory and Ellen Moers' literary 'travelling heroinism' have recently been overlooked in the current turn to culturalism and post structuralism.
For Fanny Kemble, performing Shakespeare was a means of showing that Portia was "the embodiment of ideal womanhood--generous, affectionate, and wise" or that "Juliet was a heroic young woman"--both reflecting possibilities for modern heroinism. (14) For Tennyson, Shakespeare's female characters were a means, I suggest, not just of expressing ambivalence about authorship or voicing psychological or sexual anxieties, but of commenting on contemporary social issues: women's "characteristics" (in Anna Jameson's phrase), "their social duties and domestic habits" (in Sarah Stickney Ellis's formulation), their "mission" (in a phrase common by the 1830s and used well into the 1860s when the artist George Elder Hicks titled a popular painting "Women's Mission").
(34) Ellen Moers, 'Performing Heroinism: The Myth of Corinne', in ead., Literary Women (London: Women's Press, 1978), pp.