burlap

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bur·lap

 (bûr′lăp′)
n.
A strong, coarsely woven cloth made of fibers of jute, flax, or hemp and used to make bags, to reinforce linoleum, and in interior decoration.

[Origin unknown.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

burlap

(ˈbɜːlæp)
n
(Textiles) a coarse fabric woven from jute, hemp, or the like
[C17: from borel coarse cloth, from Old French burel (see bureau) + lap1]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bur•lap

(ˈbɜr læp)

n.
1. a plain-woven coarse fabric of jute, hemp, or the like; gunny.
2. a lightweight fabric made in imitation of this.
[1685–95; earlier borelap=bore(l) coarse cloth (see bureau) + lap1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.burlap - coarse jute fabricburlap - coarse jute fabric      
bagging, sacking - coarse fabric used for bags or sacks
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

burlap

[ˈbɜːlæp] N (esp US) → arpillera f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

burlap

[ˈbɜːrlæp] n (US) (= hessian) → toile f de jute
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

burlap

nSackleinen nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Do we think we will be labelled as narrow minded and uncultured if we fail to appreciate a hessian canvas with a few daubs of thick, white paint?