hetaera

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he·tae·ra

 (hĭ-tîr′ə) also he·tai·ra (-tīr′ə)
n. pl. he·tae·rae (-tîr′ē) or he·tae·ras also he·tai·rai (-tīr′ī′) or he·tai·ras
An ancient Greek courtesan or concubine, especially one who was highly educated or refined.

[Greek hetairā, feminine of hetairos, companion; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots.]

he·tae′ric adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hetaera

(hɪˈtɪərə) or

hetaira

n, pl -taerae (-ˈtɪəriː) or -tairai (-ˈtaɪraɪ)
(Historical Terms) (esp in ancient Greece) a female prostitute, esp an educated courtesan
[C19: from Greek hetaira concubine]
heˈtaeric, heˈtairic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

he•tae•ra

(hɪˈtɪər ə)

n., pl. -tae•rae (-ˈtɪər i)
1. a highly cultured courtesan or concubine, esp. in ancient Greece.
[1810–20; < Greek hetaíra (feminine) companion]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

hetaera

a female companion or paramour of ancient Greece, a sort of professional prostitute.
See also: Greece and Greeks
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

hetaera

n pl <-rae or -ras> → Hetäre f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Myself to the hetaeras who had pushed me aside for lack of
And what is one to make in these politically correct times of the orator Apollodorus's definitions of the uses of women: "Hetaeras we keep for pleasure, concubines for attending day-by-day to the body and wives for producing heirs and for standing trusty guard on our household property."
Sensuous, discerning, and exquisitely beautiful, Madama Sui is one of the hetaeras of a Latin American strongman, identified only as El Gran Hombre or El Patron.
It is the job of Frida, known as Frine, to teach the new hetaeras the art of keeping El Gran Hombre happy.
Beauvoir relates bad faith to the hetaera, whose life as a kept woman, she says, is marred by insincerity (Beauvoir 2010, 629-630).
For the hetaera, whose fortune depends on her ability to seduce men: "her whole life is a show: her words, her gestures, are intended not to express her thoughts but to produce an effect....