heterodox


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het·er·o·dox

 (hĕt′ər-ə-dŏks′)
adj.
1. Not in agreement with accepted beliefs, especially in church doctrine or dogma.
2. Holding unorthodox opinions.

[Greek heterodoxos : hetero-, hetero- + doxa, opinion (from dokein, to think; see dek- in Indo-European roots).]

heterodox

(ˈhɛtərəʊˌdɒks)
adj
1. (Theology) at variance with established, orthodox, or accepted doctrines or beliefs
2. holding unorthodox opinions
[C17: from Greek heterodoxos holding another opinion, from hetero- + doxa opinion]
ˈheteroˌdoxy n

het•er•o•dox

(ˈhɛt ər əˌdɒks)

adj.
1. not in accordance with established doctrines, esp. in theology.
2. holding unorthodox doctrines or opinions.
[1610–20; < Greek heteródoxos of another opinion =hetero- hetero- + -doxos, adj. derivative of dóxa belief, opinion (akin to dokeîn to think, suppose)]
het′er•o•dox`ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.heterodox - characterized by departure from accepted beliefs or standards
unorthodox - breaking with convention or tradition; "an unorthodox lifestyle"

heterodox

adjective unorthodox, dissident, heretical, revisionist, unsound, iconoclastic, schismatic They were generally treating heterodox ideas as un-American.
Translations

heterodox

[ˈhetərədɒks] ADJheterodoxo

heterodox

[ˈhɛtərədɒks] adj (= unorthodox) → hétérodoxe

heterodox

References in classic literature ?
Already I was considered heterodox if not treasonable, and I was keenly alive to the danger of my position; nevertheless I could not at times refrain from bursting out into suspicious or half-seditious utterances, even among the highest Polygonal and Circular society.
Dean's question, which struck me as something heterodox.
Then Clare, thrown by sheer misery into one of the demoniacal moods in which a man does despite to his true principles, called her close to him, and fiendishly whispered in her ear the most heterodox ideas he could think of.
It might be that an Antinomian, a Quaker, or other heterodox religionist, was to be scourged out of the town, or an idle or vagrant Indian, whom the white man's firewater had made riotous about the streets, was to be driven with stripes into the shadow of the forest.
Grant, to whom the proud consciousness of the Indian sounded a little heterodox, “and it never will desert him.
Examining these heterodox pronouncements a little more closely, however, we may possibly perceive their truth.
The duchess took a brilliantly heterodox view--thought it the least susceptible organ of its kind that she had ever encountered, related examples of its want of susceptibility, and at last declared that for her the Italians were a people of ice.
Not all self-identifying heterodox economists and their organisations can be expected to agree with this reasoning, however.
There are 10 chapters divided into four parts: the long tradition of finance as a counter-productive activity in heterodox thinking: a Marxian appraisal; financial innovation, money, and capitalist exploitation: a short detour in the history of economic ideas; rethinking finance: a Marxian analytical framework; and the crisis of the Euro area.
This is an open, tolerant and eclectic view of the history of heterodox economic thought.
To suppress the ideal, heterodox clerics (and their apologists in the academy and media) engage in one, and usually several, of the following: evasion, ad hominems, pseudo-apologies, emotionalism, tendentious sloganeering, misplaced concreteness, and armchair psychoanalysis.
Perhaps the foremost champion of a Calvinist Herbert, Daniel Doerksen concurs with Hodgkins by seeing in the Jacobean and early Caroline church a middle road that runs directly through Geneva -- between not Rome and Calvin's Swiss church, but rather Rome and the more radical separatists or "those considered heterodox in theology" (21).