heterodox

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het·er·o·dox

 (hĕt′ər-ə-dŏks′)
adj.
1. Not in agreement with accepted beliefs, especially in church doctrine or dogma.
2. Holding unorthodox opinions.

[Greek heterodoxos : hetero-, hetero- + doxa, opinion (from dokein, to think; see dek- in Indo-European roots).]

heterodox

(ˈhɛtərəʊˌdɒks)
adj
1. (Theology) at variance with established, orthodox, or accepted doctrines or beliefs
2. holding unorthodox opinions
[C17: from Greek heterodoxos holding another opinion, from hetero- + doxa opinion]
ˈheteroˌdoxy n

het•er•o•dox

(ˈhɛt ər əˌdɒks)

adj.
1. not in accordance with established doctrines, esp. in theology.
2. holding unorthodox doctrines or opinions.
[1610–20; < Greek heteródoxos of another opinion =hetero- hetero- + -doxos, adj. derivative of dóxa belief, opinion (akin to dokeîn to think, suppose)]
het′er•o•dox`ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.heterodox - characterized by departure from accepted beliefs or standards
unorthodox - breaking with convention or tradition; "an unorthodox lifestyle"

heterodox

adjective unorthodox, dissident, heretical, revisionist, unsound, iconoclastic, schismatic They were generally treating heterodox ideas as un-American.
Translations

heterodox

[ˈhetərədɒks] ADJheterodoxo

heterodox

[ˈhɛtərədɒks] adj (= unorthodox) → hétérodoxe

heterodox

References in classic literature ?
His aspect showed no lack of zeal to maintain his heterodoxies, even at the stake.
First, the heterodoxies of local candidates seem to matter less and less in the way Americans make political choices.
Brown examines the ways in which Milton's heterodoxies and appropriations of biblical narrative have, for audiences, become the biblical narrative.
This was possible due to a series of traits which was unique to the European case: the politicization of utopia, the secularized historicization of temporality and the impact of heterodoxies which threatened to overthrow the established institutional order and radically reform society.
David Allen Harvey (2005), John Warne Monroe (2008), and Lynn Sharp (2006), among others, have considered various heterodoxies that had their origins in the eighteenth century and developed a life of their own in the nineteenth.
His heterodoxies, as well as Webb's stand against the war, are the things we find most attractive--and the qualities that might bring millions of voters to an Obama/Webb ticket.