heterogonic

heterogonic

(ˌhɛtərəˈɡɒnɪk)
adj
1. (Biology) exhibiting allometry
2. (Biology) exhibiting heterogeny
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References in periodicals archive ?
When b = 1, the growth is isogonic, i.e., the part grows at the same rate as the body as a whole, and when b [not equal to] 1, the growth is heterogonic, i.e., the part grows at a rate different from the body, being early (negative) if b < 1 and late (positive) if b > 1.
In the loin cut, animals with 2.0 and 3.0 mm of fat thickness showed positive heterogonic development.
Both total fat and subcutaneous fat in the treatment 2.0 mm fat thickness had a positive heterogonic growth (b > 1), since it is known that the fat tissue has a late growth.
Total fat only had a positive heterogonic growth in the treatment 3.0 mm, and in the other treatments, as well as the subcutaneous fat, it obtained isogonic growth.
With longer time of confinement, bone tissue had its heterogonic positive growth compared with the growth rate of the carcass.
Growth was considered to be heterogonic for b [not equal to] 1 and was positive for b > 1 and negative for b < 1.
Male lamb from all of the genetic groups and females from the Ile de France x Santa Ines and Bergamasca x Santa Ines crosses presented allometric coefficients of less than 1 for the feet/ankles (Table 1), corresponding to negative heterogonic growth.
Except to Bergamasca x Santa Ines females, the allometric coefficients for the heads were less than one (Table 2), indicating negative heterogonic growth, as the head grew faster than the empty body.
Bergamasca x Santa Ines males exhibited a skin allometric coefficient greater than one (Table 1), indicative of positive heterogonic growth; i.e., their skin grew slower than the empty body.
Many monogonont rotifers have heterogonic life cycles (Gilbert 1980, 1983, 1992, 1993).
Mitotically produced eggs (Viney 1994) pass to the external environment in faeces and develop either as free-living, dioecious adults (heterogonic development) or as infective, skin-penetrating larvae (homogonic development).
This has led to the general conclusion that heterogonic development occurs when conditions outside the host are favorable and those inside are unfavorable (Moncol and Triantaphyllou 1978; Schad 1989).