hetmanate


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hetmanate

(ˈhɛtməˌneɪt)
n
all of the hetmans
References in periodicals archive ?
There the German rule imposed a regime of terror, dissolving the 'Rada' in April 1918 and proclaiming the Hetmanate (Bruhat, 1977a: 39).
They eventually united under the Cossack Hetmanate. In the late seventeenth century, western Ukraine came under the domination of Poland, while eastern Ukraine came under the tutelage of Czarist Russia.
The growth of noble landownership in Sloboda Ukraine and in Left-Bank Ukraine (the Hetmanate) was even slower because of factors specific to the development of those regions and because the government was unwilling to exacerbate tensions with local inhabitants.
The Hetmanate negotiated directly and intensively, not only with the Muscovite capital but also with its military representative in the south, Grigorii Romodanovskii; Vyhovsky's interpretation of these events was that Romodanovskii was not well disposed towards him.
The botched first-ever transfer of power in the Early Modern Ukrainian Cossack polity (the so-called Hetmanate) in 1657 was a principal cause of the political crisis that followed, which only ended through the initial division of Ukraine into two halves (agreed to in the Andrusovo truce of 1667 between Poland and Russia, which was confirmed in 1686) and their eventual absorption into tsarist Russia.
Plokhy concludes that the History was produced by a circle of patriots around the figure of Stepan Shyrai in the Starodub region of what was once part of the Hetmanate and is now part of southern Russia (p.
A new ukrainian state, the cossack hetmanate, was established during the mid-17th century after an uprising against the poles.
With the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian and the Russian Empires in 1917 and the surrender of Germany a year later, the short-lived Ukrainian National Republic and Hetmanate state (1917-1923) was overrun by hordes of the newly formed Russian Bolshevik forces.
(6) Likewise, the Cossack starshina, transforming itself into a landed nobility, had a vested interest in integrating into the multiethnic--called "multicultural" by Rieber--ruling class of the Russian Empire, after drawing the Russian government into the politics of the Hetmanate for most of the 18th century.
(1) Historians have dubbed this state "the Hetmanate" and to the end of Mazepa's rule it exercised an important influence upon the more sovereign polities that surrounded it: the rapidly growing Tsardom of Muscovy, the still vast Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, and the numerous vassal Ottoman Turkish territories to its south, especially Moldavia and the Crimean Khanate.