heurism

heurism

(ˈhjʊərɪzəm)
n
(Education) the educational principle of acquiring knowledge through empirical study and practical experience
References in periodicals archive ?
As Wainwright and Turner (2004a), Chandler (2012) and Almeida and Flores-Pereira (2013) have taken dance as a useful heurism to study work from a practical and embodied perspective, we assumed that the concept of mastery could be particularly useful to guide studies on transformation processes of the body.
The heurism for scholarship becomes how, and even whether, irony can be adjusted to have persuasive effect upon polarized audiences in the political arena.
David Herman has accused the defenders of the implied author (and, by extension, defenders of the authorial audience) of minimizing the heurism of the scheme, so let me put the record straight: the authorial audience is fundamentally and profoundly a heuristic device, and I've never thought otherwise.
The preponderance of Anglophone authors reflects Deleuze's own perception of the especially disruptive lines of flight, and the resulting fruitful heurism, in English and American literature.