hexameter


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hex·am·e·ter

 (hĕk-săm′ĭ-tər)
n.
1. Verse written in lines of six metrical feet, especially classical verse in which the first four feet of each line are either dactylic or spondaic, the fifth dactylic, and the sixth spondaic.
2. A single line of such verse.

[Latin, from Greek hexametros, having six metrical feet : hexa-, hexa- + metron, meter; see meter1.]

hex′a·met′ric (hĕk-sə-mĕt′rĭk), hex′a·met′ri·cal (-rĭ-kəl) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hexameter

(hɛkˈsæmɪtə)
n
1. (Poetry) a verse line consisting of six metrical feet
2. (Poetry) (in Greek and Latin epic poetry) a verse line of six metrical feet, of which the first four are usually dactyls or spondees, the fifth almost always a dactyl, and the sixth a spondee or trochee
hexaˈmetral, hexametric, ˌhexaˈmetrical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hex•am•e•ter

(hɛkˈsæm ɪ tər)

n.
1. a line of verse having six metrical feet.
adj.
2. consisting of six metrical feet.
[1540–50; < Latin < Greek hexámetros; see hexa-, meter2]
hex`a•met′ric (-səˈmɛ trɪk) hex`a•met′ri•cal, hex•am′e•tral, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

hexameter

a verse having six metrical feet. — hexametrical, adj.
See also: Verse
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

hexameter

A metrical line of six feet.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hexameter - a verse line having six metrical feet
verse line, verse - a line of metrical text
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

hexameter

[hekˈsæmɪtəʳ] Nhexámetro m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hexameter

nHexameter m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
People do, indeed, add the word 'maker' or 'poet' to the name of the metre, and speak of elegiac poets, or epic (that is, hexameter) poets, as if it were not the imitation that makes the poet, but the verse that entitles them all indiscriminately to the name.
102, of the sonnet.] The rime-scheme is ababbcbcc , and in the last line the iambic pentameter gives place to an Alexandrine (an iambic hexameter).
Your stool limps like one of Martial's distiches; it has one hexameter leg and one pentameter leg."
It is odd therefore, that the one apposite passage which recurred to me in its entirety was in hexameters and pentameters
When the monarch inquired from what city Homer came, and whose son he was, the priestess delivered a response in hexameters after this fashion:
In twenty - four books of dactylic hexameter verse, it details the events of the few days near the end of the Trojan War, focusing on the withdrawal of Achilles from the contest and the disastrous effects of this act on the Greek campaign.
In the third chapter Orchard looks at Aldhelm's hexameter style, finding it unique.
The contrived shape of the line, that is, the pronounced chiasmus pivoting around the principal caesura, the self-contained nature of the hexameter (What the Germans call Satzvers), coupled with the repetition of the highly suggestive `thin' (tenuis), one of the most overworked metaphors of Callimachean poetics, mark the verse as thoroughly neoteric.
De rerum natura is the only large - scale poem written in dactylic hexameter that has come down to us from the period of the Roman republic and is, with the possible exception of Vergil 's epic Aeneid, the most ambitious poem written in Latin.
Mitchell, incidentally, consistently speaks of this metre as 'rhymed hexameter' and is so fond of this appellation that he applies it in the case of 'Der Donaustrom', which also employs pentameters and tetrameters.
As in hexameter poetry, the verse-ending was a feature of which at least some poets were aware.
The hexameter lends gravity to the expression and language of this personal "recherche du temps perdu." Each of the poems consists of two stanzas with a total of ten lines.