hexameter

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hex·am·e·ter

 (hĕk-săm′ĭ-tər)
n.
1. Verse written in lines of six metrical feet, especially classical verse in which the first four feet of each line are either dactylic or spondaic, the fifth dactylic, and the sixth spondaic.
2. A single line of such verse.

[Latin, from Greek hexametros, having six metrical feet : hexa-, hexa- + metron, meter; see meter1.]

hex′a·met′ric (hĕk-sə-mĕt′rĭk), hex′a·met′ri·cal (-rĭ-kəl) adj.

hexameter

(hɛkˈsæmɪtə)
n
1. (Poetry) a verse line consisting of six metrical feet
2. (Poetry) (in Greek and Latin epic poetry) a verse line of six metrical feet, of which the first four are usually dactyls or spondees, the fifth almost always a dactyl, and the sixth a spondee or trochee
hexaˈmetral, hexametric, ˌhexaˈmetrical adj

hex•am•e•ter

(hɛkˈsæm ɪ tər)

n.
1. a line of verse having six metrical feet.
adj.
2. consisting of six metrical feet.
[1540–50; < Latin < Greek hexámetros; see hexa-, meter2]
hex`a•met′ric (-səˈmɛ trɪk) hex`a•met′ri•cal, hex•am′e•tral, adj.

hexameter

a verse having six metrical feet. — hexametrical, adj.
See also: Verse

hexameter

A metrical line of six feet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hexameter - a verse line having six metrical feet
verse line, verse - a line of metrical text
Translations

hexameter

[hekˈsæmɪtəʳ] Nhexámetro m

hexameter

nHexameter m
References in periodicals archive ?
This may be a concession to Saintsbury, who had pronounced its meter anapestic because very soon into the poem most of the lines begin with unstressed syllables that "defeat the hexametrical movement" (Saintsbury, p.
Individual paper topics include divine discourse in Homer's Iliad, past and present in Pindar's religious poetry, writing sacred laws in archaic and classical Crete, embedded speech in the Attic leges sacrae, hexametrical incantations as oral and written phenomena, unknowable names and invocations in late antique theurgic ritual, Plautus the theologian, dilemmas of pietas in Roman declamation, Paul's self-images within an oral milieu, and Augustine's Psalm Against the Donatists.
The most significant subtext for Pavia's motif of transformation is obviously Ovid's hexametrical epic Metamorphoses, the poetic source of which is 250 ancient transformation myths.