hibakusha


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hibakusha

(hɪˈbɑːkʊʃə)
n, pl -sha or -shas
(Historical Terms) a survivor of either of the atomic-bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945
[C20: from Japanese, from hibaku exposed + -sha -person]
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, the prime minister's wholehearted commitment and action to make the dreams of the hibakusha come true would lead us all by 2020 to a new world of ''zero nuclear weapons,'' an achievement that would rival in human history the ''discovery of zero'' itself.
North Korean officials say there are some 1,300 victims -- known as ''hibakusha'' in Japanese -- in the country and many suffer from various effects of the bombings such as leukemia and thyroid cancer.
Kyodo sent questionnaires to 87 hibakusha who attended events in New York during the conference, with responses obtained from 66 of them.
Hirotami Yamada, a senior member of a group of A-bomb sufferers and family of those killed in the 1945 atomic bombing of Nagasaki, said he hopes the Indian minister will meet with hibakusha radiation sufferers during his visit.
The people of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, led by the survivors, called hibakusha in Japanese, have been at the forefront.
The survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the Hibakusha, have become the leaders of peace and disarmament throughout the world.
Thus was born the idea for Hibakusha Stories: Testimonies of Atomic Bomb Survivors and Today's Nuclear Weapons.
The ceremony was highlighted by a choral presentation exclusively by 'hibakusha,' or survivors of the bombing.
At a meeting later Thursday with Abe, an atom bomb survivor, or "hibakusha," confronted the prime minister, asking how exactly he could bridge the divide while remaining under the U.S.
The average age of the hibakusha (atomic-bomb sufferers) is now over 82, according to Taue.
Those who survived the bombing there, and at Nagasaki a few days later, are referred to in Japan as hibakusha.