hic jacet


Also found in: Acronyms, Idioms.

hic jacet

(hɪk ˈjækɛt)
(on gravestones) here lies
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hic ja•cet

(ˈhik ˈyɑ kɛt; Eng. ˈhɪk ˈdʒeɪ sɛt)
Latin.
here lies (often used to begin epitaphs on tombstones).
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

hic jacet

A Latin phrase meaning here lies, used on gravestones.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
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References in classic literature ?
"O eloquent, just and mighty death!" Raleigh says in the last lines of his book, "Whom none could advise, thou hast persuaded, what none hath dared, thou hast done; and whom all the world hath flattered, thou only hast cast out of the world and despised; thou hast drawn together all the far stretching greatness, all the pride, cruelty, and ambition of man, and covered it all over with these two narrow words Hic Jacet.
Staff and students from Birmingham School of Acting (BSA), part of Birmingham City University, will perform their rendition of Hic Jacet or The Corpse in the Crescent tomorrow at 2pm.
Barberini's epitaph: Hic jacet pulvis, cinis et nihil.