high noon


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high noon

n.
1. Exactly noon.
2. The highest or most advanced stage or period: the high noon of her creativity.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

high′ noon′


n.
1. the exact moment of noon.
2. the high point of a stage or period; peak.
3. a crisis or confrontation.
[1350–1400]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

high noon

- Exactly 12 noon.
See also related terms for noon.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.high noon - the middle of the dayhigh noon - the middle of the day    
24-hour interval, day, mean solar day, solar day, twenty-four hour period, twenty-four hours - time for Earth to make a complete rotation on its axis; "two days later they left"; "they put on two performances every day"; "there are 30,000 passengers per day"
time of day, hour - clock time; "the hour is getting late"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

high noon

nmezzogiorno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
It was hard upon high noon; and Ahab, seated in the bows of his high-hoisted boat, was about taking his wonted daily obervation of the sun to determine his latitude.
From the first sensation of chilling fear Clayton passed to one of keen admiration and envy of those giant muscles and that wondrous instinct or knowledge which guided this forest god through the inky blackness of the night as easily and safely as Clayton would have strolled a London street at high noon.
"Nothing was heard of our chair for some time afterwards,'' answered Grandfather.' "One day in September, the same Andrew Oliver, of whom I before told you, was summoned to appear at high noon under Liberty Tree.
Two days later they rejoined the boats at Carli; and at high noon of the third day, travelling with the current and shooting the rapids, the expedition arrived at Berande.
``It is sad enough,'' replied Athelstane; ``but I trust they will hold us to a moderate ransom At any rate it cannot be their purpose to starve us outright; and yet, although it is high noon, I see no preparations for serving dinner.
Instead, it rose on a slant, so that by high noon it had barely lifted its lower rim clear of the horizon.
On that morning when Magua led his silent party from the settlement of the beavers into the forests, in the manner described, the sun rose upon the Delaware encampment as if it had suddenly burst upon a busy people, actively employed in all the customary avocations of high noon. The women ran from lodge to lodge, some engaged in preparing their morning's meal, a few earnestly bent on seeking the comforts necessary to their habits, but more pausing to exchange hasty and whispered sentences with their friends.
I had come from Nukuheva by water in the ship's boat, and when we entered the bay of Tior it was high noon. The heat had been intense, as we had been floating upon the long smooth swell of the ocean, for there was but little wind.
Twilight had given place to night some hours, and it was high noon in those quarters of the town in which 'the world' condescended to dwell--the world being then, as now, of very limited dimensions and easily lodged--when Mr Chester reclined upon a sofa in his dressing-room in the Temple, entertaining himself with a book.
At high noon, with Van Horn, ever-attended by Jerry, standing for'ard and conning, the Arangi headed into the wind to thread the passage between two palm-tufted islets.
The naturalist looked fearfully around, as if he had an inclination to make an instant exhibition of his desperate intention; but the dusky figures, who were riding on every side of him, seemed suddenly tripled in number, and the darkness, that was already thickening on the prairie, appeared in his eyes to possess the glare of high noon.
Thou Sun, of this great World both Eye and Soule, Acknowledge him thy Greater, sound his praise In thy eternal course, both when thou climb'st, And when high Noon hast gaind, & when thou fallst.