sheriff

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sher·iff

 (shĕr′ĭf)
n.
1. A public officer in the United States with responsibility for certain law enforcement and administrative legal duties, such as making arrests and serving processes, usually for a particular county.
2. A public officer in various other countries performing certain law enforcement, judicial, or ceremonial functions.

[Middle English, the representative of royal authority in a shire, from Old English scīrgerēfa : scīr, shire + gerēfa, reeve.]

sheriff

(ˈʃɛrɪf)
n
1. (Law) (in the US) the chief law-enforcement officer in a county: popularly elected, except in Rhode Island
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in England and Wales) the chief executive officer of the Crown in a county, having chiefly ceremonial duties.
3. (Professions) (in Scotland) a judge in any of the sheriff courts
4. (Law) (in Scotland) a judge in any of the sheriff courts
5. (Professions) (in Australia) an administrative officer of the Supreme Court, who enforces judgments and the execution of writs, empanels juries, etc
6. (Law) (in Australia) an administrative officer of the Supreme Court, who enforces judgments and the execution of writs, empanels juries, etc
7. (Professions) (in New Zealand) an officer of the High Court
8. (Law) (in New Zealand) an officer of the High Court
[Old English scīrgerēfa, from scīr shire1 + gerēfa reeve1]
ˈsheriffdom n

sher•iff

(ˈʃɛr ɪf)

n.
1. the law-enforcement officer of a county or other civil subdivision of a state.
2. (formerly) an important civil officer in an English shire.
[before 1050; Old English scīrgerēfa. See shire, reeve1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sheriff - the principal law-enforcement officer in a countysheriff - the principal law-enforcement officer in a county
law officer, lawman, peace officer - an officer of the law

sheriff

noun
Related words
adjective shrieval
Translations
الشَّريف
šerif
sherif
seriff
lögreglustjóri
šerifas
šerifs
šerif
šerif
şerif

sheriff

[ˈʃerɪf]
A. N (in US) → alguacil m, sheriff m; (in England) → gobernador m civil; (in Scotland) → juez mf
B. CPD sheriff court N (Scot) → tribunal m de distrito

sheriff

[ˈʃɛrɪf] nshérif m

sheriff

nSheriff m; (Scot) → Friedensrichter(in) m(f)

sheriff

[ˈʃɛrɪf] nsceriffo

sheriff

(ˈʃerif) noun
in the United States, the chief law officer of a county, concerned with maintaining peace and order.
References in classic literature ?
I have seen High Sheriffs in the great world, whom my father went to see, give him two fingers--the High Sheriff of Barkinghamshire came to see me, and shook hands cordially.
Well, sir, as you have abundant leisure for all these important affairs, I beg that you will forget that you are high sheriff, and devote some little of your time to gallantry.
Hut would it have been decorous for the High Sheriff of —to mingle in such sports as these?
Then followed the history and rise of the ancient and respectable family, in the usual terms; how it had been first settled in Cheshire; how mentioned in Dugdale, serving the office of high sheriff, representing a borough in three successive parliaments, exertions of loyalty, and dignity of baronet, in the first year of Charles II, with all the Marys and Elizabeths they had married; forming altogether two handsome duodecimo pages, and concluding with the arms and motto:--"Principal seat, Kellynch Hall, in the county of Somerset," and Sir Walter's handwriting again in this finale:--
Mr Mowbray's role as one of 55 High Sheriffs in England and Wales is to support the crown, the judiciary and the emergency services, while also promoting the voluntary sector in the area.
No such nonsense these days in Mid Glamorgan as High Sheriffs serve the Queen above all, performing their work under the warm authority of the Queen's representative, the Lord Lieutenant, Katrin Thomas of Nelson.
The plaque's unveiling was performed by Tim Watts, High Sheriff of The West Midlands, and saw a rare gathering of three high sheriffs to mark the occasion
He is one of 55 High Sheriffs representing England's counties and holds office for a year.
In one of the most ancient official ceremonies still practised in this country, which dates back more than 1,000 years to Saxon times, judges and court officials gathered at the High Court, some wearing wigs and court clothing designed centuries ago, in order to preside over the formal nomination of 51 High Sheriffs and their deputies from all over England and Wales.
The event will also be attended by the mayors or mayoresses of Atherstone, Kenilworth, Warwick, Shipston, Nuneaton, Rugby and Leamington, along with Warwickshire police crime commissioner Ron Ball, the chairman of Warwick District Council Richard Davies, previous high sheriffs and local businessmen and women.
A HIGH Court judge assembled with Teesside judges, High Sheriffs and other dignitaries in a ceremony to mark the start of the legal year.
Golding, who is currently the regional director of one of Prince Charles' charities, took part in an ancient nomination ceremony in London for all the country's High Sheriffs before being selected to the unpaid position.