high wire


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Related to high wire: High wire act

high wire

n.
A tightrope for aerialists that is stretched very high above the ground.
Idiom:
high-wire act Slang
A risky job or operation.

high′-wire′ adj.

high wire

n
(Theatre) a tightrope stretched high in the air for balancing acts

high′ wire′


n.
a tightrope stretched high above the ground.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.high wire - a tightrope very high above the groundhigh wire - a tightrope very high above the ground
tightrope - tightly stretched rope or wire on which acrobats perform high above the ground
Translations
حَبْل البَهْلَوان
line
lína
yüksekte gerilmiş ip

high

(hai) adjective
1. at, from, or reaching up to, a great distance from ground-level, sea-level etc. a high mountain; a high dive; a dive from the high diving-board.
2. having a particular height. This building is about 20 metres high; My horse is fifteen hands high.
3. great; large; considerable. The car was travelling at high speed; He has a high opinion of her work; They charge high prices; high hopes; The child has a high fever/temperature.
4. most important; very important. the high altar in a church; Important criminal trials are held at the High Court; a high official.
5. noble; good. high ideals.
6. (of a wind) strong. The wind is high tonight.
7. (of sounds) at or towards the top of a (musical) range. a high note.
8. (of voices) like a child's voice (rather than like a man's). He still speaks in a high voice.
9. (of food, especially meat) beginning to go bad.
10. having great value. Aces and kings are high cards.
adverb
at, or to, a great distance from ground-level, sea-level etc. The plane was flying high in the sky; He'll rise high in his profession.
ˈhighly adverb
1. very; very much. highly delighted; highly paid; I value the book highly.
2. with approval. He thinks/speaks very highly of you.
ˈhighness noun
1. the state or quality of being high.
2. a title of a prince, princess etc. Your Highness; Her Highness.
ˈhigh-chair noun
a chair with long legs, used by a baby or young child at mealtimes.
ˌhigh-ˈclass adjective
of high quality. This is a high-class hotel.
higher education
education beyond the level of secondary school education, eg at a university.
high fidelity high quality and great accuracy (in the reproduction of sound). See also hi-fi
ˌhigh-ˈhanded adjective
done, acting, without consultation of, or consideration for, other people. a high-handed decision; A new headmaster should try not to be too high-handed.
ˌhigh-ˈhandedly adverb
ˌhigh-ˈhandedness noun
high jump
a sports contest in which people jump over a bar which is raised until no-one can jump over it.
ˈhighlands noun plural
a mountainous part of certain countries, especially (with capital) of Scotland.
ˈhigh-level adjective
involving important people. high-level talks.
ˈhighlight noun
the best or most memorable event, experience, part of something etc. The highlight of our holiday was a trip to a brewery.
verb
to draw particular attention to (a person, thing etc).
ˌhighly-ˈstrung adjective
very nervous; very easily upset or excited.
ˌhigh-ˈminded adjective
having or showing good or noble ideals, principles etc.
ˌhigh-ˈmindedness noun
ˌhigh-ˈpitched adjective
(of sounds, voices etc) high, sharp. a high-pitched, childish voice.
ˌhigh-ˈpowered adjective
(with an engine which is) very powerful. a high-powered motorboat/engine.
ˈhigh-rise adjective
with many storeys. She does not like living in a high-rise flat as the children cannot get out to play easily.
ˈhighroad noun
a main road.
high school
a secondary school. She goes to high school next year.
ˌhigh-ˈspirited adjective
showing high spirits. a high-spirited horse.
high spirits
enthusiasm, cheerfulness and energy. He's in high spirits today.
high street
(with capital when used as a name) the main street of a town etc, usually with shops etc.
high-tech (ˌhai ˈtek) noun
(also hi-tech, ~high technology) the use of advanced machines and equipment in industry.
adjective
(also hi-tech). high-tech industries.
high tide
the time when the tide is farthest up the shore. High tide today is at 15.46; They set sail at high tide.
high treasontreasonhigh water
the time at which the tide or other water (eg a river) is at its highest point.
ˈhighway noun
a road, especially a large or main road.
Highway Code
in Britain, (a booklet containing) a set of official rules for road users.
ˈhighwaymanplural ˈhighwaymen noun
in earlier times, a man usually on horseback, who attacked and robbed people travelling in coaches etc on public roads.
high wirewirehigh and dry
1. (of boats) on the shore; out of the water. The boat was left high and dry of the beach.
2. in difficulties. Her husband has left her high and dry without any money.
high and low
everywhere. I've searched high and low for that book.
high and mighty
behaving as if one thinks one is very important. Don't be so high and mighty – you're just like any one of us.
the high seas
the open seas; far from land.
it is etc high time
something ought to be done or have been done etc by now. It is high time that this job was finished; It's high time someone spanked that child.

see also tall.

wire

(ˈwaiə) noun
1. (also adjective) (of) metal drawn out into a long strand, as thick as string or as thin as thread. We need some wire to connect the battery to the rest of the circuit; a wire fence.
2. a single strand of this. There must be a loose wire in my radio somewhere.
3. the metal cable used in telegraphy. The message came over the wire this morning.
4. a telegram. Send me a wire if I'm needed urgently.
verb
1. to fasten, connect etc with wire. The house has been wired (up), but the electricity hasn't been connected yet.
2. to send a telegram to. Wire me if anything important happens.
3. to send (a message) by telegram. You can wire the details to my brother in New York.
ˈwireless noun
an older word for (a) radio.
ˈwiring noun
the (system of) wires used in connecting up a circuit etc.
high wire
a high tightrope. acrobats on the high wire.
ˌwire-ˈnetting noun
a material with wide mesh woven of wire, used in fencing etc.
References in classic literature ?
Jumping over forms, and creeping under tables, I made my way to one of the fire-places; there, kneeling by the high wire fender, I found Burns, absorbed, silent, abstracted from all round her by the companionship of a book, which she read by the dim glare of the embers.
Mbeha said the inmate was allowed, but he instead allegedly jumped over a nearly two-metre high wire fence.
Owen jokingly asked if he could try the high wire out and to his surprise, leader of the troupe Mustafa Danger agreed.
Petit, pictured right, first found fame when he secretly installed a high wire between the two towers of Notre-Dame in Paris in 1971 and "juggled balls and pranced back and forth" as the crowd applauded below.
TWO siblings from the famed circus act the Flying Wallendas have completed a death-defying stunt, crossing New York's Times Square on a high wire strung between two skyscrapers 25 storeys above the pavement.
Likewise, the high wire was nothing less than a daredevil act performed without a safety net.
Prior information notice without call for competition: High wire facility skegness
IF your idea of a good day out is watching amazing high wire walkers or other death-defying stunts, you'll need to book tickets for a new circus coming to Cardiff.
ON THE WEBSITE...TOP 4 THINGS TODAY ARE: 1 WATCH: A clip of spectacular footage of a high wire act walking across the funnel of the Duke of Lancaster ship in Flintshire 2 WATCH: Police are investigating after Colwyn Bay's Christmas tree was vandalised by yobs.
It said: "We're excited to announce that from mid-September three of our core range 330ml cans - Salty Kiss, Inhaler and High Wire West Coast Pale Ale will be nationally listed with Marks & Spencer.
This technology is capable of providing a low-speed start, preventing activation of the dead point, and having advantages such as low-cost materials, short winding time, high wire fill-in ratio and small volume.
High Wire Act Radar Pictures, Brad Anderson Jon Hamm,