high-hat cymbals

high-hat cymbals

also hi-hat cymbals  (hī′hăt′)
pl.n.
A pair of cymbals positioned to be worked by a foot pedal.

high′-hat′ cym`bals


n.pl.
a pair of cymbals mounted on a rod so that the upper cymbal can be lifted and dropped on the lower by means of a pedal.
[1930–35]
References in periodicals archive ?
In honor of his theatrical style, imagine a drumbeat under the words--first Tibetan temple drums and procession gongs, changing to the rat-tat of a jazz snare drum, then ending with a snap crash on the high-hat cymbals. "Those Buddhist lamas," he began, were hung up on transformation, you hear.
Later, during the 1920s and 1930s, high-hat cymbals - at first less than one foot high and called low boys (Papa Joe Jones told me in 1981 that he invented the longer rod which brought the high hat to its present, aptly named height, but the Leedy drum company stole his idea and took all the rewards) - bass drum pedals, manufactured mounted and floor tom-toms, and larger cymbals came to be included in the drumset.