high-risk


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high-risk

(hī′rĭsk′)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characterized by risk: a high-risk business.
2. Being particularly subject to potential danger or hazard: high-risk cardiac patients.

high-risk

adj
denoting a group, part, etc, that is particularly subject or exposed to a danger
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.high-risk - not financially safe or securehigh-risk - not financially safe or secure; "a bad investment"; "high risk investments"; "anything that promises to pay too much can't help being risky"; "speculative business enterprises"
unsound - not sound financially; "unsound banking practices"
Translations

high-risk

[ˌhaɪˈrɪsk] ADJ [investment, policy] → de alto riesgo
References in periodicals archive ?
* possibly backing off from the use of high-risk organs because they are afraid of being sued or anticipate pressure from regulators.
The evidence also indicates that high-risk patients benefit from a statin--preferably in high doses--regardless of their baseline LDL or degree of LDL reduction with treatment (SOR: A, a large randomized controlled trial [RCT] and meta-analyses).
The study in Rakai, Uganda, had a secondary aim--to investigate whether male circumcision was also protective against high-risk strains of human papillomavirus (HPV).
Since the late 1970s, various state governments have supported programs that provide health insurance coverage for those who would not otherwise be able to obtain or afford health insurance due to "high-risk" medical conditions.
The legislation does provide funds for temporary high-risk pools, but this program, the Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan, suffers from major drawbacks.
The incidence rate of cardiovascular disease events among men was 30.5 per 1 000 person years (95% CI 29.9-31.2) in high-risk patients identified with QRISK and 23.7 per 1 000 person years (23.2-24.1) in high-risk patients identified with Anderson Framingham.
Several studies have examined the role of sensation seeking as a mediating variable in the association between substance abuse and high-risk behaviour (13-15).
In this issue of Advances in Breast Cancer we are privileged to have three eminent specialists review the genetic basis of high-risk breast cancer predisposition genes and the status of two aspects of risk-reduction surgery: risk-reducing mastectomies in gene mutation carriers who are well and the management of the contralateral breast in cancer-affected carriers.
GAO's biennial reports on high-risk areas, done since 1990, are meant to bring focus to specific areas needing added attention.
Among high-risk women, 6.1% suffered an osteoporotic fracture compared to 1.8% of the lower-risk women.
In RS, low-risk customers are worse off owing to an externality created by high-risk buyers in the market.
It's known as FTO and comes in a high-risk form and a low-risk one.