highroad


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high road

also high·road (hī′rōd′)
n.
1.
a. The easiest or surest path or course: the high road to happiness.
b. The most positive, diplomatic, or ethical course.
2. Chiefly British A main road; a highway.

highroad

(ˈhaɪˌrəʊd)
n
1. (Automotive Engineering) a main road; highway
2. (the highroad) the sure way: the highroad to fame.

high•road

(ˈhaɪˌroʊd)

n.
1. Chiefly Brit. highway.
2. an easy or certain course: the highroad to success.
3. an honorable or ethical course.
[1700–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.highroad - a highwayhighroad - a highway        
highway, main road - a major road for any form of motor transport
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Translations
طَريق رئيسي
silnice
hovedvej
fõút
òjóî-/aîalvegur
ana yolgeniş cadde

highroad

[ˈhaɪˌrəʊd] nstrada principale or maestra

high

(hai) adjective
1. at, from, or reaching up to, a great distance from ground-level, sea-level etc. a high mountain; a high dive; a dive from the high diving-board.
2. having a particular height. This building is about 20 metres high; My horse is fifteen hands high.
3. great; large; considerable. The car was travelling at high speed; He has a high opinion of her work; They charge high prices; high hopes; The child has a high fever/temperature.
4. most important; very important. the high altar in a church; Important criminal trials are held at the High Court; a high official.
5. noble; good. high ideals.
6. (of a wind) strong. The wind is high tonight.
7. (of sounds) at or towards the top of a (musical) range. a high note.
8. (of voices) like a child's voice (rather than like a man's). He still speaks in a high voice.
9. (of food, especially meat) beginning to go bad.
10. having great value. Aces and kings are high cards.
adverb
at, or to, a great distance from ground-level, sea-level etc. The plane was flying high in the sky; He'll rise high in his profession.
ˈhighly adverb
1. very; very much. highly delighted; highly paid; I value the book highly.
2. with approval. He thinks/speaks very highly of you.
ˈhighness noun
1. the state or quality of being high.
2. a title of a prince, princess etc. Your Highness; Her Highness.
ˈhigh-chair noun
a chair with long legs, used by a baby or young child at mealtimes.
ˌhigh-ˈclass adjective
of high quality. This is a high-class hotel.
higher education
education beyond the level of secondary school education, eg at a university.
high fidelity high quality and great accuracy (in the reproduction of sound). See also hi-fi
ˌhigh-ˈhanded adjective
done, acting, without consultation of, or consideration for, other people. a high-handed decision; A new headmaster should try not to be too high-handed.
ˌhigh-ˈhandedly adverb
ˌhigh-ˈhandedness noun
high jump
a sports contest in which people jump over a bar which is raised until no-one can jump over it.
ˈhighlands noun plural
a mountainous part of certain countries, especially (with capital) of Scotland.
ˈhigh-level adjective
involving important people. high-level talks.
ˈhighlight noun
the best or most memorable event, experience, part of something etc. The highlight of our holiday was a trip to a brewery.
verb
to draw particular attention to (a person, thing etc).
ˌhighly-ˈstrung adjective
very nervous; very easily upset or excited.
ˌhigh-ˈminded adjective
having or showing good or noble ideals, principles etc.
ˌhigh-ˈmindedness noun
ˌhigh-ˈpitched adjective
(of sounds, voices etc) high, sharp. a high-pitched, childish voice.
ˌhigh-ˈpowered adjective
(with an engine which is) very powerful. a high-powered motorboat/engine.
ˈhigh-rise adjective
with many storeys. She does not like living in a high-rise flat as the children cannot get out to play easily.
ˈhighroad noun
a main road.
high school
a secondary school. She goes to high school next year.
ˌhigh-ˈspirited adjective
showing high spirits. a high-spirited horse.
high spirits
enthusiasm, cheerfulness and energy. He's in high spirits today.
high street
(with capital when used as a name) the main street of a town etc, usually with shops etc.
high-tech (ˌhai ˈtek) noun
(also hi-tech, ~high technology) the use of advanced machines and equipment in industry.
adjective
(also hi-tech). high-tech industries.
high tide
the time when the tide is farthest up the shore. High tide today is at 15.46; They set sail at high tide.
high treasontreasonhigh water
the time at which the tide or other water (eg a river) is at its highest point.
ˈhighway noun
a road, especially a large or main road.
Highway Code
in Britain, (a booklet containing) a set of official rules for road users.
ˈhighwaymanplural ˈhighwaymen noun
in earlier times, a man usually on horseback, who attacked and robbed people travelling in coaches etc on public roads.
high wirewirehigh and dry
1. (of boats) on the shore; out of the water. The boat was left high and dry of the beach.
2. in difficulties. Her husband has left her high and dry without any money.
high and low
everywhere. I've searched high and low for that book.
high and mighty
behaving as if one thinks one is very important. Don't be so high and mighty – you're just like any one of us.
the high seas
the open seas; far from land.
it is etc high time
something ought to be done or have been done etc by now. It is high time that this job was finished; It's high time someone spanked that child.

see also tall.
References in classic literature ?
He went out of the meadow and walked along the highroad towards the village.
The barking of dogs showed the carriage had reached the village, and all that was left was the empty fields all round, the village in front, and he himself isolated and apart from it all, wandering lonely along the deserted highroad.
While we were on the highroad, Blantyre had given me my head; but now, with a light hand and a practiced eye, he guided me over the ground in such a masterly manner that my pace was scarcely slackened, and we were decidedly gaining on them.
He is back there on the highroad with the hardest stick I've met in a good many days.
Maggie soon got out of breath with running, but by the time Tom got to the pond again she was at the distance of three long fields, and was on the edge of the lane leading to the highroad.
Thou mayst tell the good Queen that I will leave this place without delay, and will let the landlord think that we are going to Saint Albans; but when we are upon the highroad again, I will go one way through the country and will send my men the other, so that if one falleth into the King's hands the others may haply escape.
Follow the cross-road, and when it brings you into the highroad, turn to the left; a four-mile walk will take you to the town of Harminster.
My spirits rose to their natural height as I struck into the highroad again, and beheld across the level plain the smoke, chimneys, and church spires of a large manufacturing town.
Then they were on the highroad and she saw hedges and trees.
The vicarage was set back from the highroad to Tercanbury, and from the dining-room one saw a semicircular strip of lawn and then as far as the horizon green fields.
At dawn on the sixteenth of November, Denisov's squadron, in which Nicholas Rostov served and which was in Prince Bagration's detachment, moved from the place where it had spent the night, advancing into action as arranged, and after going behind other columns for about two thirds of a mile was stopped on the highroad.
He was fortunate enough when he got on to the highroad to be overtaken by the stage-coach, which carried him to Brassing; and there he took the new-made railway, observing to his fellow-passengers that he considered it pretty well seasoned now it had done for Huskisson.