hikoi


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hikoi

(ˈhiːkɔɪ)
n
a walk or march, esp a Māori protest march
vb
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (intr) to take part in such a march
[Māori]
References in periodicals archive ?
In August this year, she led a hikoi in Auckland as part of the indigenous nurses' conference to lobby the Government to end pay disparities for Maori nurses working for iwi health providers.
In comparison with their colonial counterparts, there is no evidence of any access to electrical modalities, and no evidence of well known Maori occupations and activities that might have been used therapeutically, including kapa haka (traditional dance) or waka ama (outrigger canoe racing); occupational activities like tinana waka/marae (building and restoring boats/meeting houses) or flax weaving; hikoi (walks); or warrior training 'games' like poi rakau (long staff) or patu (short handled club).
Hikoi is a Maori word that can be compared to our sacred walk.
Protests included a successful claim to the United Nations, whereby the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination condemned the Act; (111) a political protest hikoi (march) of about 20,000 Maori on Parliament grounds; and a resignation of a Maori Labour Cabinet Minister, Tarina Turia, followed by her re-election to the New Zealand Parliament as a representative of the newly formed Maori Party.
Parmi ceux-ci, citons la Marche Maori [sic] pour la terre de 1975, l'occupation de Bastion Point de 1978 et la marche de protestation, ou hikoi, pour le littoral et les fonds marins de 2004.
Few people know it, but it was Winston Peters' work on a Maori land claim for his Ngati Wai iwi that inspired Cooper to lead her now famous hikoi from the far north to Wellington in 1975, known to history now as "the Land March".
Despite the police blockades, the hikoi raised public consciousness of the raids and galvanized Maori solidarity.
The Tamaki Hikoi, a Maori guided walk of Auckland, gives visitors a sense of the importance of the culture in what is a proudly bicultural country.
The Tamaki Hikoi, a Maori-guided walk of Auckland, gives visitors a sense of the importance of the culture in what is a proudly bicultural country.
regular hikoi (walks) to historic places of local significance not only provided exercise, but also encouraged a deeper understanding of the natural environment and led to the identification of native plants, and the sharing of knowledge about rongoa (medicines) and Maori healing practices.
Te Hikoi Marama: A Directory of Maori Information Resources.
In 'True tales from the fiction workshop,' an essay responding to Patrick Evans's criticisms of the Manhire 'School', he recounts advising a Maori woman writer, struggling to fictionalise a hikoi she had attended, to start with her observation that the women were expected to do the cooking: something particular and vivid that concentrated the contradictions in a heated political moment.