hillock

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hill·ock

 (hĭl′ək)
n.
1. A small hill.
2. Biology A small protuberance or elevation, as from an organ, tissue, or structure.

[Middle English hillok, from hil, hill; see hill.]

hill′ock·y adj.

hillock

(ˈhɪlək)
n
(Physical Geography) a small hill or mound
[C14 hilloc, from hill + -ock]
ˈhillocked, ˈhillocky adj

hill•ock

(ˈhɪl ək)

n.
a small hill.
[1350–1400]
hill′ocked, hill′ock•y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hillock - a small natural hillhillock - a small natural hill      
anthill, formicary - a mound of earth made by ants as they dig their nest
hill - a local and well-defined elevation of the land; "they loved to roam the hills of West Virginia"
kopje, koppie - a small hill rising up from the African veld
molehill - a mound of earth made by moles while burrowing

hillock

noun mound, knoll, hummock, barrow, knap (dialect), tump (Western English dialect), monticule He had spent the night huddled behind a hillock for shelter.
Translations
تَلَّه، أكَمَه
kopeček
lille bakke
hóll
tepeciktümsek

hillock

[ˈhɪlək] Nmontículo m, altozano m

hillock

[ˈhɪlək] npetite colline f, butte f

hillock

nHügel m, → Anhöhe f

hillock

[ˈhɪlək] ncollinetta, poggio

hill

(hil)
1. noun a piece of high land, smaller than a mountain. We went for a walk in the hills yesterday.
2. a slope on a road. This car has difficulty going up steep hills.
ˈhillock (-lək) noun
a small hill.
ˈhilly adjective
having many hills. hilly country.
ˈhillside noun
the side or slope of a hill. The hillside was covered with new housing.
References in classic literature ?
Ere long the sand had accumulated in compact masses; and there, where so recently stretched a level plain as far as the eye could see, rose now a ridgy line of hillocks, still moving from beneath--the vast tomb of an entire caravan!
What little he could see of the surrounding country was far from alluring--a vast expanse of rough country, rolling in little, barren hillocks, and tufted here and there with clumps of dreary shrub.
The grass wore the deep tint of the cypress, and the heads of its blades hung droopingly, and hither and thither among it were many small unsightly hillocks, low and narrow, and not very long, that had the aspect of graves, but were not; although over and all about them the rue and the rosemary clambered.
It throws up at the mouth of its burrows hillocks of earth like those of the mole, but smaller.
As we approached the Shimerdas' dwelling, I could still see nothing but rough red hillocks, and draws with shelving banks and long roots hanging out where the earth had crumbled away.
There was a velvety stretch of ground in the Sawyer pasture which was full of fascinating hollows and hillocks, as well as verdant levels, on which to build houses.
It was only hard work when he had to break off the motion, which had become unconscious, and to think; when he had to mow round a hillock or a tuft of sorrel.
Not long afterwards, as he ascended a small hillock, he saw at its foot a Lion feeding on the Calf.
After penetrating through the brush, matted as it was with briars, for a few hundred feet, he entered an open space, that surrounded a low, green hillock, which was crowned by the decayed blockhouse in question.
Their bases swell gently from the plain, looking at that distance perfectly round and smooth; and upon the top of each is a vast hillock covered with snow, exactly corresponding to the nipple on the female breast.
In the centre was a hillock or tumulus, surmounted by a scorched hawthorn.
Let the reader picture to himself, crowning a limestone hillock, an oblong mass of masonry fifteen feet in height, thirty wide, forty long, with a gate, an external railing and a platform; on this platform sixteen enormous pillars of rough hewn stone, thirty feet in height, arranged in a colonnade round three of the four sides of the mass which support them, bound together at their summits by heavy beams, whence hung chains at intervals; on all these chains, skeletons; in the vicinity, on the plain, a stone cross and two gibbets of secondary importance, which seemed to have sprung up as shoots around the central gallows; above all this, in the sky, a perpetual flock of crows; that was Montfauçon.