hipsterism


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hip·ster

 (hĭp′stər)
n. Informal
A young, usually urban bohemian who cultivates an ironic sensibility.

hip′ster·ism (-stə-rĭz′əm) n.

hipsterism

(ˈhɪpstərˌɪzəm)
n
the fact or condition of being a hipster

hip•ster•ism

(ˈhɪp stəˌrɪz əm)

n.
1. the condition of being a hipster.
2. the characteristics of a hipster.
[1955–60, Amer.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Cardiff ranked 14th for searches for veganism, with a plant-based diet considered to go hand in hand with the rise in hipsterism.
But in the decade of austerity, and Brexit and Trump, hipsterism is a glimmer of cultural light in a dark, pessimistic world.
notion of "hipsterism" as a more authentic form of living in
But one can easily see evidence of this creeping, bland hipsterism in many American cities; terms like "coffee culture" and "microbrewery" are stand-ins for "the savvy whites have arrived to buy up cheap real estate." There are physical markers to the landscape of a gentrifying neighborhood, too: an article on LAist noted the ubiquity of pseudo-modernist, horizontal wooden-slat fences entombing front yards in transitioning neighborhoods as "a signifier for the exhaustive pace at which the city has changed in the past 5 to 10 years--for better or worse." Good fences make invisible neighbors.
So we could snarl with disdain toward those attending costly private schools, especially in the South, though certain Ivy schools such as Harvard (from whence came Kennedy and most of his cabinet) and off-beat liberal arts schools such as Reed College, known to propagate hipsterism, were exempt.
But Miles, while remaining very hip, at the same time also lived and worked far beyond the insular world of hipsterism and avant-garde bohemia.