hircocervus


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hircocervus

(ˌhɜːkəʊˈsɜːvəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) (in classical and medieval fable) a mythical creature that is half goat and half stag
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References in periodicals archive ?
En otro lugar de la Ordinatio, Ockham tambien dice lo siguiente: '.chimera et hircocervus.sunt aliqua quae tantum habent esse obiectivum.
Foremost scholar of Thomas Aquinas and late Scholastic philosophy in general, Doyle is honored by North American and European colleagues with 13 essays pivoting on the notion of something that can be known but does not exist, symbolized by the half-goat/half-stag hircocervus. Among the topics are the eternity of the world according to Peter of Candia, what Aquinas learned from Maimonides, John Duns Scotus' approach to metaphysics, and Augustinian abstraction and Henry of Ghent's metaphysical argument.
The koy or hircocervus: gazelle/goat crossbreed to the talmudic Sages, deer/goat crossbreed in the Western tradition
Contrasting with that quotation from Bavli, Hullin 80a, the Greeks and the Romans respectively called a wild ruminant (apparently, a bearded antelope or deer) [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and hircocervus in that order, expressing the belief that it was a crossbreed of goat and deer, not gazelle.
(37) For the Scholastics, the hircocervus, which itself goes back to the Greek [GREEK OMITTED]; for this last, see Plato, Republic VI, 488 A and Aristotle, Prior Analytics 1.38.49a24; Posterior Analytics 2.7.92b5-8, and Perihermewas 1.16al6.
It occurs, he says, when "opposites are simultaneously in the intellect" (opposita insimul).(19) The most obvious instance of such would be furnished by a goat-stag, or in the Latin translations of Aristotle and Averroes, a hircocervus. Once again, a goat is not a stag and a stag is not a goat.
Et quandoque dicitur de communiori, scillicet, de omni re concepta in anima, sive ita se habeat extra animam, sive non, ut hircocervus, chimera.
81 "Itaque monstrum illud formidabile Hircocervus, nihil aliud est, quam hircus et cervus reales, quatenus substant alicui judicio affirmanti hircum de cervo"; Morawski, Totius philosophiae, d.