hires


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

hire

 (hīr)
v. hired, hir·ing, hires
v.tr.
1.
a. To engage the services of (a person) for a fee; employ: hired a new clerk.
b. To engage the temporary use of for a fee; rent: hire a car for the day.
2. To grant the services of or the temporary use of for a fee: hired himself out as a cook; hired out the cottage for the summer.
v.intr.
To obtain work: She hired on as a deck hand. He hired out as a photographer.
n.
1.
a. The act of hiring.
b. The condition or fact of being hired.
2.
a. Payment for services; wages.
b. Payment for the use of something.
3. Informal One who is hired: two new hires in the sales department.

[Middle English hiren, from Old English hȳrian.]

hir′a·ble, hire′a·ble adj.
hir′er n.
References in classic literature ?
You commission a messenger, who hires in your name the whole of the town of Havre, without considering the members of the French court, who would be sure to arrive here to meet Madame.
The Traveler asserted that he had, with the hire of the Ass, hired his Shadow also.
The boats that, as a rule, are let for hire on the Thames above Marlow, are very good boats.
I was ever on the look-out for means of escape; and, find- ing no direct means, I determined to try to hire my time, with a view of getting money with which to make my escape.
You'd want me not to hire a good wagoner, 'cause he'd got a mole on his face.
The distance was too long for a walk, but Clare felt such a strong desire for isolation that at first he would neither hire a conveyance nor go to a circuitous line of railway by which he might eventually reach the place.
For many years the business had struggled along with a flavour of romantic insecurity in a small, dissolute-looking shop in the High Street, adorned with brilliantly coloured advertisements of cycles, a display of bells, trouser-clips, oil-cans, pump-clips, frame-cases, wallets, and other accessories, and the announcement of "Bicycles on Hire," "Repairs," "Free inflation," "Petrol," and similar attractions.
Hitherto I had always been driven by people who at least knew how to drive; but in this place I was to get my experience of all the different kinds of bad and ignorant driving to which we horses are subjected; for I was a "job horse", and was let out to all sorts of people who wished to hire me; and as I was good-tempered and gentle, I think I was oftener let out to the ignorant drivers than some of the other horses, because I could be depended upon.
I don't need to hire any of my hands out, unless I've a mind to.
I shall depart for the latter town in a fortnight or three weeks; and my intention is to hire a ship there, which can easily be done by paying the insurance for the owner, and to engage as many sailors as I think necessary among those who are accustomed to the whale-fishing.
There is likewise a kind of beggarly princes in Europe, not able to make war by themselves, who hire out their troops to richer nations, for so much a day to each man; of which they keep three-fourths to themselves, and it is the best part of their maintenance: such are those in many northern parts of Europe.
A week or two after I dropped the letter I was in a hansom on my way to certain barracks when loud above the city's roar I heard that accursed haw-haw-haw, and there they were, the two of them, just coming out of a shop where you may obtain pianos on the hire system.