hirundine

(redirected from hirundines)

hirundine

(hɪˈrʌndɪn; -daɪn)
adj
1. (Animals) of or resembling a swallow
2. (Animals) belonging to the bird family Hirundinidae, which includes swallows and martins
[C19: from Late Latin hirundineus, from Latin hirundō a swallow]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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But the return of the cold weather means that there are not so many insects flying, which makes food-finding very difficult for the hirundines.
ON Monday evening, the air a little warmer and insects hatching from the lagoons, it was wonderful to watch a flock of hirundines at RSPB Conwy: hundreds of Sand Martins, interspersed with a handful of Swallows and an occasional House Martin.
He pondered differing notions about birds (especially swallows and martins--the Hirundines) and weighed the possibility that they might actually hibernate at winter, as was widely accepted at the time, or migrate by flying away to vacation in a warmer climate and then return --the same actual birds!
The swift feeds on insects at a higher altitude than swallows and martins (hirundines) so can cope with pollution levels that the smaller birds can't.
The hirundines will be on their way south later this month, but the swifts have already started their journeys to Africa.
(17,18) For example, falcons, hirundines (Hirundinidae), and seabirds have a high aspect ratio (narrow and elongated wings) and high wing loading (high weight for a low surface), whereas vultures, storks (Ciconiidae), and other land-soaring birds have a low aspect ratio (broad and short wings) and low wing loading (Fig 2).
As the summer migration moves into full swing, hirundines are being spotted in increasingly larger numbers, with the early arriving sand martins quickly followed by swallows.
Don Wilson watched hirundines and swifts over Crosby Marine Lake, and a wheatear, presumably a Greenland.
These popular hirundines have a massive journey ahead of them to Africa and so it's no surprise that a few have delayed starting out on their long trek.
It is barely a week since I was watching swallows hawking low over cold grey water in a biting easterly at Marshside - I felt sorry for the poor hirundines as they struggled to find food.
Just like home, the kite was elusive - but fortunately more marsh harriers, hirundines and a hobby meant there was enough to watch until the black kite made an appearance, flapping up onto a telegraph pole to spread its wings like a cormorant, drenched after yet more heavy rain.
Both birds coincided with a period of heavy cloud and a clear passage of swifts and hirundines.