histamine


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his·ta·mine

 (hĭs′tə-mēn′, -mĭn)
n.
A physiologically active amine, C5H9N3, found in plant and animal tissue and released from mast cells as part of an allergic reaction in humans. It stimulates gastric secretion and causes dilation of capillaries, constriction of bronchial smooth muscle, and decreased blood pressure.


his′ta·min′ic (-mĭn′ĭk) adj.

histamine

(ˈhɪstəˌmiːn; -mɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) an amine formed from histidine and released by the body tissues in allergic reactions, causing irritation. It also stimulates gastric secretions, dilates blood vessels, and contracts smooth muscle. Formula: C5H9N3. See also antihistamine
[C20: from hist(idine) + -amine]
histaminic adj

his•ta•mine

(ˈhɪs təˌmin, -mɪn)

n.
a histidine-derived amine compound that is released mainly by damaged mast cells in allergic reactions, causing dilation and permeability of blood vessels and lowering blood pressure.
[1910–15; hist (idine) + amine]
his`ta•min′ic (-ˈmɪn ɪk) adj.

his·ta·mine

(hĭs′tə-mēn′)
An organic compound found widely in animals and plants. In humans and other mammals, histamine is released as part of the body's immune response, causing a variety of changes in the body including enlargement of the blood vessels, tightening of the airways, and faster beating of the heart. The itchiness and sneezing typical of an allergic reaction are caused by the release of histamine.

histamine

A hormone in almost all body tissues, released by antigen—antibody reactions. Its effects include making blood vessels expand and leak.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.histamine - amine formed from histidine that stimulates gastric secretions and dilates blood vessels; released by the human immune system during allergic reactions
amine, aminoalkane - a compound derived from ammonia by replacing hydrogen atoms by univalent hydrocarbon radicals
Translations

histamine

n (Med) → Histamin nt

his·ta·mine

n. histamina, sustancia que produce efecto dilatador en los vasos capilares y estimula la secreción gástrica;
___ blockersbloquedor de ___.

histamine

n histamina
References in periodicals archive ?
A dog's body will release histamines in response to an allergen such as pollen.
They contain basophilic granules that release histamine, cytokines, and other substances that are involved in producing inflammatory and allergic reactions.
If you're at a Christmas party, try to avoid aged cheeses, smoked meats and smoked fish - they will all make your headache worse the next day, as they contain high levels of histamine."
Therefore, vasoactive mediators and cytokines such as adenosine, histamine, CGRP, NO, TNF-a and VIP released from activated mast cells increase vascular permeability of dura mater (10).
Histamine poisoning (also known as scombroid poisoning) occurs following consumption of certain fish species which contain histamine.
During the study, Moeser compared the histamine responses of mice to two types of stress conditions - psychological and allergic - where the immune system becomes overworked.
During immunoglobulin E--(IgE-) dependent responses, cross-linking of the FceRI/IgE complexes leads to MC activation and degranulation of a wide range of bioactive products, including histamine [2].
Histamine and its receptors represent a complex system of immunoregulation with distinct effects mediated by four GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors HRs 1-4) and their differential expression, which changes according to the stage of cell differentiation and microenvironmental influences.
Histamine increased amplitude of gut contractility in longitudinal muscle strips of both non-Hirschsprung as well as Hirschsprung's cases and contractility responses were almost equal and similar in magnitude.
Semipurified sweat antigen from normal adults induced histamine release from the basophils of 77% of patients with AD and 66% of patients with cholinergic urticaria in Japan [7, 8].