hitch

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hitch
top: clove hitch
center: cow hitch
bottom: two half hitches

hitch

 (hĭch)
v. hitched, hitch·ing, hitch·es
v.tr.
1. To fasten, connect, or attach: hitched the horses to the sleigh.
2. To move or raise by pulling or jerking: hitch up one's pants.
3. Informal To get (a ride) by hitchhiking: hitched a ride to the rally.
4. Slang To marry: They got hitched last month.
v.intr.
1.
a. To move jerkily: "She hitched forward to make room for me on the seat" (Paul Theroux).
b. To move or walk haltingly: He hitched along on his painful ankle.
2. Informal To hitchhike.
n.
1. Any of various knots used to secure a line to another object such as a post or ring.
2. A device used to connect one thing to another: a trailer hitch.
3. A short jerking motion; a tug: answered with a hitch of her head.
4. A hobble or limp: a hitch in his step.
5. An impediment or a delay: a hitch in our plans.
6. A term of service, especially of military service.
7. Informal A free ride obtained along a road.

[Probably from Middle English hytchen, icchen, to move, jerk.]

hitch′er n.

hitch

(hɪtʃ)
vb
1. (Knots) to fasten or become fastened with a knot or tie, esp temporarily
2. (often foll by up) to connect (a horse, team, etc); harness
3. (often foll by: up) to pull up (the trousers, a skirt, etc) with a quick jerk
4. (intr) chiefly US to move in a halting manner: to hitch along.
5. to entangle or become entangled: the thread was hitched on the reel.
6. (tr; passive) slang to marry (esp in the phrase get hitched)
7. informal to obtain (a ride or rides) by hitchhiking
n
8. an impediment or obstacle, esp one that is temporary or minor: a hitch in the proceedings.
9. (Knots) a knot for fastening a rope to posts, other ropes, etc, that can be undone by pulling against the direction of the strain that holds it
10. a sudden jerk; tug; pull: he gave it a hitch and it came loose.
11. chiefly US a hobbling gait: to walk with a hitch.
12. a device used for fastening
13. informal a ride obtained by hitchhiking
14. slang US and Canadian a period of time spent in prison, in the army, etc
[C15: of uncertain origin]
ˈhitcher n

hitch1

(hɪtʃ)
v.t.
1. to fasten or tie, esp. temporarily, by means of a hook, rope, strap, etc.: to hitch a horse to a post.
2. to harness (an animal) to a vehicle (often fol. by up).
3. to raise with jerks (usu. fol. by up); hike up: to hitch up one's trousers.
4. to move or draw (something) with a jerk.
5. Slang. to bind by marriage vows; unite in marriage; marry.
6. to catch, as on a projection; snag.
v.i.
7. to stick, as when caught.
8. to fasten oneself or itself to something (often fol. by on).
9. to move roughly or jerkily: The old buggy hitched along.
10. to hobble; limp.
n.
11. the act or fact of fastening, as to something, esp. temporarily.
12. any of various knots or loops made to attach a rope to something in such a way as to be readily loosened.
13. a period of military service.
14. an unexpected difficulty, obstacle, delay, etc.
15. a hitching movement.
16. a hitching gait; a hobble or limp.
17. a fastening that joins a movable tool to the mechanism that pulls it.
[1400–50; late Middle English; of obscure orig.]
hitch′er, n.

hitch3

(hɪtʃ)

v.i., v.t. hitched, hitch•ing.
n.
Informal. hitchhike.
[1865–70; by shortening]
hitch′er, n.

hitch


Past participle: hitched
Gerund: hitching

Imperative
hitch
hitch
Present
I hitch
you hitch
he/she/it hitches
we hitch
you hitch
they hitch
Preterite
I hitched
you hitched
he/she/it hitched
we hitched
you hitched
they hitched
Present Continuous
I am hitching
you are hitching
he/she/it is hitching
we are hitching
you are hitching
they are hitching
Present Perfect
I have hitched
you have hitched
he/she/it has hitched
we have hitched
you have hitched
they have hitched
Past Continuous
I was hitching
you were hitching
he/she/it was hitching
we were hitching
you were hitching
they were hitching
Past Perfect
I had hitched
you had hitched
he/she/it had hitched
we had hitched
you had hitched
they had hitched
Future
I will hitch
you will hitch
he/she/it will hitch
we will hitch
you will hitch
they will hitch
Future Perfect
I will have hitched
you will have hitched
he/she/it will have hitched
we will have hitched
you will have hitched
they will have hitched
Future Continuous
I will be hitching
you will be hitching
he/she/it will be hitching
we will be hitching
you will be hitching
they will be hitching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hitching
you have been hitching
he/she/it has been hitching
we have been hitching
you have been hitching
they have been hitching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hitching
you will have been hitching
he/she/it will have been hitching
we will have been hitching
you will have been hitching
they will have been hitching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hitching
you had been hitching
he/she/it had been hitching
we had been hitching
you had been hitching
they had been hitching
Conditional
I would hitch
you would hitch
he/she/it would hitch
we would hitch
you would hitch
they would hitch
Past Conditional
I would have hitched
you would have hitched
he/she/it would have hitched
we would have hitched
you would have hitched
they would have hitched

Hitch

1. The attaching of a team to the implement to be pulled.
2. The connecting linkage between the team and the implement.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hitch - a period of time spent in military servicehitch - a period of time spent in military service
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
2.hitch - the state of inactivity following an interruptionhitch - the state of inactivity following an interruption; "the negotiations were in arrest"; "held them in check"; "during the halt he got some lunch"; "the momentary stay enabled him to escape the blow"; "he spent the entire stop in his seat"
inaction, inactiveness, inactivity - the state of being inactive
countercheck - a check that restrains another check
logjam - any stoppage attributable to unusual activity; "the legislation ran into a logjam"
3.hitch - an unforeseen obstaclehitch - an unforeseen obstacle    
obstacle, obstruction - something immaterial that stands in the way and must be circumvented or surmounted; "lack of imagination is an obstacle to one's advancement"; "the poverty of a district is an obstacle to good education"; "the filibuster was a major obstruction to the success of their plan"
4.hitch - a connection between a vehicle and the load that it pulls
connecter, connector, connective, connection, connexion - an instrumentality that connects; "he soldered the connection"; "he didn't have the right connector between the amplifier and the speakers"
5.hitch - a knot that can be undone by pulling against the strain that holds it; a temporary knot
Blackwall hitch - a simple hitch used for temporarily attaching a line to a hook
cat's-paw - a hitch in the middle of rope that has two eyes into which tackle can be hooked
knot - any of various fastenings formed by looping and tying a rope (or cord) upon itself or to another rope or to another object
rolling hitch - a hitch for fastening a line to a spar or another rope
becket bend, sheet bend, weaver's hitch, weaver's knot - a hitch used for temporarily tying a rope to the middle of another rope (or to an eye)
timber hitch - a hitch used to secure a rope to a log or spar; often supplemented by a half hitch
6.hitch - any obstruction that impedes or is burdensome
clog - any object that acts as a hindrance or obstruction
impedimenta, obstruction, obstructor, obstructer, impediment - any structure that makes progress difficult
speed bump - a hindrance to speeding created by a crosswise ridge in the surface of a roadway
7.hitch - the uneven manner of walking that results from an injured leghitch - the uneven manner of walking that results from an injured leg
gait - a person's manner of walking
Verb1.hitch - to hook or entangle; "One foot caught in the stirrup"
attach - cause to be attached
catch - cause to become accidentally or suddenly caught, ensnared, or entangled; "I caught the hem of my dress in the brambles"
snag - catch on a snag; "I snagged my stocking"
unhitch - unfasten or release from or as if from a hitch
2.hitch - walk impeded by some physical limitation or injury; "The old woman hobbles down to the store every day"
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
3.hitch - jump vertically, with legs stiff and back arched; "the yung filly bucked"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
4.hitch - travel by getting free rides from motorists
ride - be carried or travel on or in a vehicle; "I ride to work in a bus"; "He rides the subway downtown every day"
5.hitch - connect to a vehicle: "hitch the trailer to the car"
connect, link, link up, tie - connect, fasten, or put together two or more pieces; "Can you connect the two loudspeakers?"; "Tie the ropes together"; "Link arms"

hitch

noun
1. problem, catch, trouble, check, difficulty, delay, hold-up, obstacle, hazard, drawback, hassle (informal), snag, uphill (S. African), stoppage, mishap, impediment, hindrance The five-hour operation went without a hitch.
verb
1. (Informal) hitchhike, thumb a lift I hitched a lift into town.
2. fasten, join, attach, unite, couple, tie, connect, harness, tether, yoke, make fast We hitched the horse to the cart.
get hitched (Informal) marry, get married, tie the knot (informal) The report shows that fewer couples are getting hitched.
hitch something up pull up, tug, jerk, yank, hoick He hitched his trousers up over his potbelly.

hitch

verb
1. To walk in a lame way:
2. Slang. To join or be joined in marriage:
Idiom: tie the knot.
noun
1. A term of service, as in the military or in prison:
2. A limited, often assigned period of activity, duty, or opportunity:
bout, go, inning (often used in plural), shift, spell, stint, stretch, time, tour, trick, turn, watch.
Translations
سَحْبَة إلى أعْلىعائِق، عَقَبَهعَقَبَةعُقْدَهيستوقِفُ سيّارة ليسافِر مجانا
uzelzádrhelháčekjet stopemnesnáz
bindeblaffeforbindehindringhiv
ongelmasorkka
zastoj
ráerősítstoppolváratlan akadály
ferîast á puttanumfesta; spenna fyrirfyrirstaîarykkur; togstikk
障害
장애
būti pavėžėtamkeliauti autostopukeliautojas autostopumazgasprikabinti
aizāķētaizķeršanāsbraukt ar autostopucilpagrūdiens
štopati
ryck
การหยุดชะงัก
bağlamakbeklenmedik sorunçekiştirmeçekmeotostop yapmak
cản trở

hitch

[hɪtʃ]
A. N
1. (= impediment, obstacle) → obstáculo m, impedimento m
without a hitchsin ningún problema
there's been a slight hitchha habido un pequeño contratiempo
2. (= tug) → tirón m, jalón m (LAm)
3. (= knot) → vuelta f de cabo
B. VT
1. to hitch a lifthacer autoestop, hacer dedo, pedir aventón (Mex)
they hitched a lift to Romellegaron a Roma haciendo autoestop
2. (= fasten) → atar, amarrar (to a) to hitch a horse to a wagonenganchar un caballo a un carro
3. to get hitchedcasarse
4. (= shift) → mover de un tirón
he hitched a chair overacercó una silla a tirones
C. VI (also hitchhike) → hacer autoestop, ir a dedo, hacer dedo, pedir aventón (Mex)
hitch up VT + ADV [+ trousers, sleeves] → remangarse, subirse

hitch

[ˈhɪtʃ]
n
(= difficulty) → anicroche f, contretemps m
There were various minor hitches, such as the sliding doors jamming → Il y a eu diverses anicroches sans gravité, comme les portes coulissantes qui se coinçaient.
There's been a slight hitch → Il y a eu un léger contretemps.
technical hitch → incident m technique
without a hitch → sans anicroche
to go off without a hitch → se passer sans anicroche
It all went off without a hitch → Tout s'est passé sans anicroche.
(= knot) → nœud m
vt
to hitch a lift, to hitch a ride → faire du stop
You can usually hitch a lift in someone's pick-up
BUT On peut d'habitude être pris en stop dans le pick-up de quelqu'un.; En général, on trouve quelqu'un qui vous prend en stop dans son pick-up.
I hitched a ride to Lochmaddy → Je suis allé à Lochmaddy en stop., Je me suis rendu à Lochmaddy en stop.
(= fasten) to hitch sth to sth, to hitch sth onto sth → accrocher qch à qch
to hitch one's skirt round one's waist → remonter sa jupe jusqu'aux hanches
(= marry) to get hitched → se caser , se mettre la bague au doigt
Neither man is planning to get hitched → Aucun des deux hommes ne projette de se caser., Aucun des deux hommes ne projette de se mettre la bague au doigt.
They're getting hitched tomorrow → Ils se mettent la bague au doigt demain.
to get hitched to sb → mettre la bague au doigt de qn
vifaire du stop
Philippe had hitched all over Europe → Philippe avait fait du stop à travers toute l'Europe.
hitch up
vt sep
[+ horse, cart] → atteler
[+ trousers, skirt] → remonter
vi
to hitch up with sb → s'associer avec qn

hitch

n
(= snag)Haken m; (in plan, proceedings, programme) → Schwierigkeit f, → Problem nt; a technical hitcheine technische Panne; without a hitchreibungslos, ohne Schwierigkeiten; but there is a hitchaber die Sache hat einen Haken; there’s been a hitches haben sich Schwierigkeiten ergeben, da ist ein Problem aufgetaucht
(= quick pull)Ruck m; she gave her skirt a quick hitchsie zog schnell ihren Rock am Bund zurecht
(= knot)Knoten m; (Naut) → Stek m
(inf, = lift) I got a hitch all the way to Londonich bin in einem Rutsch bis London (durch)getrampt (inf)
vt
(= fasten)festmachen, anbinden (→ sth to sth etw an etw dat); to hitch one’s wagon to a star (dated US) → sich (dat)ein hohes Ziel setzen, nach den Sternen greifen (geh); to hitch one’s wagon to somebody (dated US) → sich mit jdm zusammentun
(inf) to get hitchedheiraten, vor Anker gehen (hum); why don’t we get hitched?warum heiraten wir (eigentlich) nicht?
to hitch a lift or ridetrampen, per Anhalter fahren; she hitched a lift or ride with a truck driverein Lastwagenfahrer nahm sie mit
vi (esp Brit) → trampen, per Anhalter fahren ? also hitchhike

hitch

:
hitchhike
viper Anhalter fahren, trampen; he’s been away hitchhiking around Europeer ist durch Europa getrampt
hitchhiker
nAnhalter(in) m(f), → Tramper(in) m(f)
hitchhiking
nTrampen nt

hitch

[hɪtʃ]
1. n (impediment, obstacle) → intoppo, contrattempo; (difficulty) → difficoltà f inv
technical hitch → difficoltà tecnica
without a hitch → senza intoppi, a gonfie vele
2. vt
a. (fasten) → attaccare; (to post) → legare
to get hitched (fam) → sposarsi
b. (fam) to hitch a liftfare l'autostop
3. vi (fam) = hitchhike
hitch up vt + adv (trousers) → tirarsi su; (horse, cart) → attaccare

hitch

(hitʃ) verb
1. to fasten to something. He hitched his horse to the fence-post; He hitched his car to his caravan.
2. to hitch-hike. I can't afford the train-fare to London – I'll have to hitch.
noun
1. an unexpected problem or delay. The job was completed without a hitch.
2. a kind of knot.
3. a sudden, short pull upwards. She gave her skirt a hitch.
ˈhitch-hike verb
to travel by means of free rides in other people's cars. He has hitch-hiked all over Britain.
ˈhitch-hiker noun
hitch a lift/ride
to get a free ride in someone else's car.
hitch up
to pull up or raise with a sudden short pull. He hitched up his trousers.

hitch

عَقَبَة zádrhel vanskelighed Haken πρόσκομμα complicación ongelma empêchement zastoj inconveniente 障害 장애 tegenslag problem komplikacja empecilho препятствие ryck การหยุดชะงัก ufak sorun cản trở 故障