hoarding


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hoard·ing

 (hôr′dĭng)
n.
1. A temporary wooden fence around a building or structure under construction or repair.
2. often hoardings An overhanging wooden structure temporarily mounted atop the walls of a fortification to aid in repelling attackers.
3. Chiefly British A billboard.

[Obsolete hoard, hourd, from French dialectal hourd, fence, scaffold, hurdle, from Old French, of Germanic origin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hoarding

(ˈhɔːdɪŋ)
n
1. (Marketing) a large board used for displaying advertising posters, as by a road. Also called (esp US and Canadian): billboard
2. (Building) a temporary wooden fence erected round a building or demolition site
[C19: from C15 hoard fence, from Old French hourd palisade, of Germanic origin, related to Gothic haurds, Old Norse hurth door]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hoarding

billboard
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hoarding - large outdoor signboardhoarding - large outdoor signboard    
signboard, sign - structure displaying a board on which advertisements can be posted; "the highway was lined with signboards"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
حاجِز حَوْل مَبْنىلَوْح كَبير للإعلانات
ohradaplakátovací stěna
plankeværkreklametavle
deszkakerítésfalragasztábla
auglÿsingaskiltitimburòil
skelbimų lentatvora
afišu dēlis
stena na plagáty

hoarding

1 [ˈhɔːdɪŋ] N (= fence) → valla f; (for advertisements) → valla f publicitaria

hoarding

2 [ˈhɔːdɪŋ] N (= act) → acumulación f, retención f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hoarding

[ˈhɔːrdɪŋ] n
(British) (for advertisements)panneau m d'affichage, panneau m publicitaire
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

hoarding

1
n (of food etc)Hamstern nt; (of capital)Anhäufen nt, → Anhäufung f

hoarding

2
n (Brit: = fence, board) → Bretterzaun m; (at building sites also) → Bauzaun m; (advertising) hoardingPlakatwand f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

hoarding

[ˈhɔːdɪŋ] n (Brit) (for advertisements) → tabellone m or riquadro per affissioni; (wooden fence) → staccionata, palizzata
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

hoarding

(ˈhoːdiŋ) noun
1. a temporary fence of boards, eg round a place where a building is being knocked down or built.
2. a usually large wooden board on which advertisements, posters etc are stuck.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Here, against a hoarding of decaying timber, he is brought to bay and tumbles down, lying gasping at his pursuer, who stands and gasps at him until the woman comes up.
He says it with such a pitiable air, and his grimy tears appear so real, and he lies in the corner up against the hoarding so like a growth of fungus or any unwholesome excrescence produced there in neglect and impurity, that Allan Woodcourt is softened towards him.
The boy, in rough sort stunned by what he hears, falls to smearing his dirty forehead with his dirty palm, and to staring at the ground, and to shaking from head to foot until the crazy hoarding against which he leans rattles.
Jo, shaking and chattering, slowly rises and stands, after the manner of his tribe in a difficulty, sideways against the hoarding, resting one of his high shoulders against it and covertly rubbing his right hand over his left and his left foot over his right.
Jo looks all round the court again, looks at his questioner's knees again, and concludes by laying his profile against the hoarding in a sort of resignation.
"Ah!" Very apprehensive of being overheard, Jo looks about him and even glances up some ten feet at the top of the hoarding and through the cracks in it lest the object of his distrust should be looking over or hidden on the other side.
Not that the idea of being robbed presented itself often or strongly to his mind: hoarding was common in country districts in those days; there were old labourers in the parish of Raveloe who were known to have their savings by them, probably inside their flock-beds; but their rustic neighbours, though not all of them as honest as their ancestors in the days of King Alfred, had not imaginations bold enough to lay a plan of burglary.
His life had reduced itself to the functions of weaving and hoarding, without any contemplation of an end towards which the functions tended.
On the right hand, the blank unwhitewashed wall of a four-storied house stretched far into the court; on the left, a wooden hoarding ran parallel with it for twenty paces into the court, and then turned sharply to the left.
His was a veritable fever for acquiring and hoarding, in the matter of science.
She was sure that presently the hoardings, the quarries, the one-story saloons, the wooden green-houses in ragged gardens, and the rocks from which goats surveyed the scene, would vanish before the advance of residences as stately as her own--perhaps (for she was an impartial woman) even statelier; and that the cobble- stones over which the old clattering omnibuses bumped would be replaced by smooth asphalt, such as people reported having seen in Paris.
SIALKOT -- The Agriculture Department had initiated a vigorous drive against overcharging and hoarding of fertilizer in Sialkot, Daska, Pasrur and Sambrial tehsils of Sialkot district.