hobo


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

ho·bo

 (hō′bō)
n. pl. ho·boes or ho·bos
1. One who wanders from place to place without a permanent home or a means of livelihood.
2. A migrant worker.
3. also hobo bag A large, crescent-shaped handbag with a single shoulder strap and usually a zippered top.
intr.v. ho·boed, ho·bo·ing, ho·boes
To live or wander like a vagrant.

[Origin unknown.]

ho′bo·ism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

hobo

(ˈhəʊbəʊ)
n, pl -bos or -boes
1. a tramp; vagrant
2. a migratory worker, esp an unskilled labourer
[C19 (US): origin unknown]
ˈhoboism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ho•bo

(ˈhoʊ boʊ)

n., pl. -bos, -boes.
1. a tramp or vagrant.
2. a migratory worker.
[1885–90, Amer.; orig. uncertain]
ho′bo•ism, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

hobo

- A style of handbag or purse that is typically large and characterized by a crescent shape, a slouchy posture and a long strap designed to wear over the shoulder.
See also related terms for shoulder.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hobo - a disreputable vagranthobo - a disreputable vagrant; "a homeless tramp"; "he tried to help the really down-and-out bums"
dosser, street person - someone who sleeps in any convenient place
drifter, vagrant, vagabond, floater - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
المُتَشَرِّد
tramp
vagabond
umrenningur
keliaujantis sezoninis darbininkas
klaidonis
bezdomnykloszardrobotnik sezonowytrampwagabunda
tramp

hobo

[ˈhəʊbəʊ] N (hobo(e)s (pl)) (US) → vagabundo/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

hobo

[ˈhəʊbəʊ] n (US)vagabond m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

hobo

n (US)
(= tramp)Penner m (inf)
(= worker)Wanderarbeiter m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

hobo

[ˈhəʊbəʊ] n (Am) → vagabondo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

hobo

(ˈhəubəu) plural ˈhobo(e)s noun
(American) a tramp.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"And I was also honored with sixty days in the Hobo."
"The Hobo, my dear fellow, is the name for that particular place of detention in city and county jails wherein are assembled tramps, drunks, beggars, and the riff-raff of petty offenders.
Then, as others have mutilated its sense, the tramp mutilates its form, and ho-boy becomes exultantly hobo. Wherefore, the large stone and brick cells, lined with double and triple-tiered bunks, in which the Law is wont to incarcerate him, he calls the Hobo.
"Slim and I hiked out to a neck of woods just beyond town, and there was the push, a score of husky hobos, charmingly located on the bank of a little purling stream.
"All of which signifies that the hobos had better strike out and do some lively begging in order to get the wherewithal to celebrate my return to the fold after a year's separation.
Sometimes I wish I was a hobo. They don't work, an' they get their livin'.
Martin dispensed royal largess, inviting everybody up, farm-hands, a stableman, and the gardener's assistant from the hotel, the barkeeper, and the furtive hobo who slid in like a shadow and like a shadow hovered at the end of the bar.
This was a hobo jungle, pitched in a thin strip of woods that lay between a railroad embankment and the bank of a river.
He is not embarrassed by the sans gene of the hobo, nor put out of countenance by the etiquette of the prince.
It's the old man talkin' to some hobo of a hired man that wants to marry his daughter.
One never saw the fields, nor any green thing whatever, in Packingtown; but one could go out on the road and "hobo it," as the men phrased it, and see the country, and have a long rest, and an easy time riding on the freight cars.
When I hoboed, and hadn't the price of a bed, a saloon was the only place that would receive me and give me a chair by the fire.