hobo

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ho·bo

 (hō′bō)
n. pl. ho·boes or ho·bos
1. One who wanders from place to place without a permanent home or a means of livelihood.
2. A migrant worker.
3. also hobo bag A large, crescent-shaped handbag with a single shoulder strap and usually a zippered top.
intr.v. ho·boed, ho·bo·ing, ho·boes
To live or wander like a vagrant.

[Origin unknown.]

ho′bo·ism n.

hobo

(ˈhəʊbəʊ)
n, pl -bos or -boes
1. a tramp; vagrant
2. a migratory worker, esp an unskilled labourer
[C19 (US): origin unknown]
ˈhoboism n

ho•bo

(ˈhoʊ boʊ)

n., pl. -bos, -boes.
1. a tramp or vagrant.
2. a migratory worker.
[1885–90, Amer.; orig. uncertain]
ho′bo•ism, n.

hobo

- A style of handbag or purse that is typically large and characterized by a crescent shape, a slouchy posture and a long strap designed to wear over the shoulder.
See also related terms for shoulder.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hobo - a disreputable vagranthobo - a disreputable vagrant; "a homeless tramp"; "he tried to help the really down-and-out bums"
dosser, street person - someone who sleeps in any convenient place
drifter, vagrant, vagabond, floater - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support
Translations
المُتَشَرِّد
tramp
vagabond
umrenningur
keliaujantis sezoninis darbininkas
klaidonis
bezdomnykloszardrobotnik sezonowytrampwagabunda
tramp

hobo

[ˈhəʊbəʊ] N (hobo(e)s (pl)) (US) → vagabundo/a m/f

hobo

[ˈhəʊbəʊ] n (US)vagabond m

hobo

n (US)
(= tramp)Penner m (inf)
(= worker)Wanderarbeiter m

hobo

[ˈhəʊbəʊ] n (Am) → vagabondo

hobo

(ˈhəubəu) plural ˈhobo(e)s noun
(American) a tramp.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 1973 movie, "Emperor of the North," was the story of hoboes in the 1930s.
College-level collections strong in labor history will appreciate this focus on hoboes who rode the rails and harvested, help creating the economy and culture of the American West.
Back before John Hodgman made hobo names ironic, hoboes were anonymous laborers who crisscrossed the country in search of work.
Bulls: Guards hired to keep hoboes off freight trains.
Hundreds of thousands of hoboes were already riding the rails by the time the Great Depression greatly swelled their numbers.
In the 1930s and 1940s, people who had fled from the Oklahoma Dust Bowl were usually called hoboes.
In this rich cultural history, Todd DePastino explains how out of the Civil War and industrial capitalism an army of footloose hoboes constructed a countercultural movement grounded in migratory work, mutual aid, masculinity, and whiteness.
1) For the hoboes, tramps, and bums who wandered across North America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, not much had changed.
American nomads; travels with lost conquistadors, mountain men, cowboys, Indians, hoboes, truckers, and bullriders.
In the case of Marc Hannon, it also provided him with a name for his band -- the Great Northwestern Hoboes.