hobo

(redirected from hoboing)
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ho·bo

 (hō′bō)
n. pl. ho·boes or ho·bos
1. One who wanders from place to place without a permanent home or a means of livelihood.
2. A migrant worker.
3. also hobo bag A large, crescent-shaped handbag with a single shoulder strap and usually a zippered top.
intr.v. ho·boed, ho·bo·ing, ho·boes
To live or wander like a vagrant.

[Origin unknown.]

ho′bo·ism n.

hobo

(ˈhəʊbəʊ)
n, pl -bos or -boes
1. a tramp; vagrant
2. a migratory worker, esp an unskilled labourer
[C19 (US): origin unknown]
ˈhoboism n

ho•bo

(ˈhoʊ boʊ)

n., pl. -bos, -boes.
1. a tramp or vagrant.
2. a migratory worker.
[1885–90, Amer.; orig. uncertain]
ho′bo•ism, n.

hobo

- A style of handbag or purse that is typically large and characterized by a crescent shape, a slouchy posture and a long strap designed to wear over the shoulder.
See also related terms for shoulder.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hobo - a disreputable vagranthobo - a disreputable vagrant; "a homeless tramp"; "he tried to help the really down-and-out bums"
dosser, street person - someone who sleeps in any convenient place
drifter, vagrant, vagabond, floater - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support
Translations
المُتَشَرِّد
tramp
vagabond
umrenningur
keliaujantis sezoninis darbininkas
klaidonis
bezdomnykloszardrobotnik sezonowytrampwagabunda
tramp

hobo

[ˈhəʊbəʊ] N (hobo(e)s (pl)) (US) → vagabundo/a m/f

hobo

[ˈhəʊbəʊ] n (US)vagabond m

hobo

n (US)
(= tramp)Penner m (inf)
(= worker)Wanderarbeiter m

hobo

[ˈhəʊbəʊ] n (Am) → vagabondo

hobo

(ˈhəubəu) plural ˈhobo(e)s noun
(American) a tramp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Historians of homelessness and hoboing will certainly find his approach a useful case study of the relationship between relief officers and transients.
Granade's book is not an exhaustive account of Partch's life and works: only those compositions emerging from Partch's experience on the road hoboing are given full attention here.
In 1998, Congress investigated the problem of railroad fatalities, and Jolene Molitoris, chief of the Federal Railroad Administration, suggested the high numbers of deaths stemmed from "the glamorization of hoboing." The unemployed no longer ride freights from city to city, for the most part, although certain harvests, like potatoes and sugar beets, still attract migrant workers.