hobo

(redirected from hoboing)
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ho·bo

 (hō′bō)
n. pl. ho·boes or ho·bos
1. One who wanders from place to place without a permanent home or a means of livelihood.
2. A migrant worker.
3. also hobo bag A large, crescent-shaped handbag with a single shoulder strap and usually a zippered top.
intr.v. ho·boed, ho·bo·ing, ho·boes
To live or wander like a vagrant.

[Origin unknown.]

ho′bo·ism n.

hobo

(ˈhəʊbəʊ)
n, pl -bos or -boes
1. a tramp; vagrant
2. a migratory worker, esp an unskilled labourer
[C19 (US): origin unknown]
ˈhoboism n

ho•bo

(ˈhoʊ boʊ)

n., pl. -bos, -boes.
1. a tramp or vagrant.
2. a migratory worker.
[1885–90, Amer.; orig. uncertain]
ho′bo•ism, n.

hobo

- A style of handbag or purse that is typically large and characterized by a crescent shape, a slouchy posture and a long strap designed to wear over the shoulder.
See also related terms for shoulder.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hobo - a disreputable vagranthobo - a disreputable vagrant; "a homeless tramp"; "he tried to help the really down-and-out bums"
dosser, street person - someone who sleeps in any convenient place
drifter, vagrant, vagabond, floater - a wanderer who has no established residence or visible means of support
Translations
المُتَشَرِّد
tramp
vagabond
umrenningur
keliaujantis sezoninis darbininkas
klaidonis
bezdomnykloszardrobotnik sezonowytrampwagabunda
tramp

hobo

[ˈhəʊbəʊ] N (hobo(e)s (pl)) (US) → vagabundo/a m/f

hobo

[ˈhəʊbəʊ] n (US)vagabond m

hobo

n (US)
(= tramp)Penner m (inf)
(= worker)Wanderarbeiter m

hobo

[ˈhəʊbəʊ] n (Am) → vagabondo

hobo

(ˈhəubəu) plural ˈhobo(e)s noun
(American) a tramp.
References in periodicals archive ?
Granade's book is not an exhaustive account of Partch's life and works: only those compositions emerging from Partch's experience on the road hoboing are given full attention here.
These mostly young working men, for whom hoboing was a rite of passage and a stage in the life cycle, encountered this agrarian labour market in ways already shaped by patriarchal relations, and often found themselves negotiating the internal hierarchies of the farming household.
While hoboing he managed to get hold of many of the world's classics, and became what someone called "a literary bum.