hogweed


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Related to hogweed: cow parsnip, Common Hogweed

hog·weed

 (hôg′wēd′, hŏg′-)
n.
1. Any of various coarse weedy plants of the genus Heracleum of the parsley family, having divided leaves and small flowers in umbels, and including several species that are phototoxic.
2. Any of various other coarse weeds, such as horseweed or ragweed.

hogweed

(ˈhɒɡˌwiːd)
n
(Plants) any of several coarse weedy umbelliferous plants, esp cow parsnip. See also giant hogweed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hogweed - tall coarse plant having thick stems and cluster of white to purple flowershogweed - tall coarse plant having thick stems and cluster of white to purple flowers
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Heracleum, Heracleum - widely distributed genus of plants with usually thick rootstocks and large umbels of white flowers
Translations

hogweed

[ˈhɒgˌwiːd] npanace m, sedano dei prati
References in periodicals archive ?
We studied all the routes of the teams and brought to the municipalities the plans of the lands that are needed first of all to put into circulation in the second and third quarters, and where it is first of all necessary to compete with the hogweed of Sosnovsky, "said Andrei Razin.
Two-year-old Lexi Buchanan was out walking with mum Jamie and their dog when she came into contact with giant hogweed, dubbed Britain's most dangerous plant.
A warm start to the summer followed by a period of rain has seen growth of the giant hogweed accelerate.
The highly toxic Giant Hogweed has been known to cause several children to be hospitalised with third-degree burns after their skin was exposed to the stem.
Called toxic giant hogweed, it thrives in the warmth and can be extremely dangerous to humans.
A three-year project aims to clear Giant Hogweed along a 1.
Giant hogweed has been pictured in various locations across Teesside in recent years - and has now returned.
I WAS interested in the article 'Sort out a knotty problem or you could be in court' (September 22) saying the council now have new powers against landowners who let Japanese Knotweed or Giant Hogweed spread out of control.
GIANT Hogweed is an invasive plant that is an increasing nuisance and can pose a serious health risk to people and pets.
In the dim light I could make out the luminous white heads of flowering Giant Hogweed.
She was fine this time but between ticks and giant hogweed I'm a nervous wreck.
After my column last week on giant hogweed and other poisonous plants, reader David Marsden from Bridlington, East Yorkshire, wrote in with these tips: