holden


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hold·en

 (hōl′dən)
v. Archaic
A past participle of hold1.

holden

(ˈhəʊldən)
vb
archaic or dialect a past participle of hold1

hold1

(hoʊld)

v. held, hold•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to have or keep in the hand; grasp: to hold someone's hand.
2. to set aside; reserve or retain: to hold a reservation.
3. to bear, sustain, or support with or as if with the hands or arms.
4. to keep in a specified state: The preacher held them spellbound.
5. to detain: The police held her for questioning.
6. to conduct; carry on: to hold a meeting.
7. to hinder; restrain: Fear held me from acting.
8. to have the ownership or use of; possess or occupy: to hold a position of authority.
9. to contain or be capable of containing: This bottle holds a quart.
10. to make accountable: We will hold you to your word.
11. to keep in the mind; believe: held certain beliefs.
12. to regard; consider: to hold a person responsible.
13. to keep forcibly: Enemy forces held the hill.
14. to point; aim: He held a gun on the prisoner.
15. to decide legally.
16. to sustain (a musical note, chord, or rest).
17. to omit, as from an order: One burger - hold the pickle.
v.i.
18. to remain in a specified state: Hold still.
19. to maintain a grasp; remain fast: The clamp held.
20. to maintain one's position against opposition.
21. to agree; sympathize: She doesn't hold with new ideas.
22. to remain faithful: to hold to one's purpose.
23. to remain valid: The rule still holds.
24. to refrain; forbear (usu. used imperatively).
25. hold back,
a. to restrain; check: to hold back tears.
b. to hinder the advancement of.
c. to refrain from giving or revealing; withhold: to hold back information.
d. to refrain from participating.
26. hold down,
a. to keep under control or at a low level: to hold down interest rates.
b. to continue to function in: to hold down a job.
27. hold forth, to speak at great length.
28. hold oneself in, to exercise restraint.
29. hold off,
a. to keep at a distance; repel.
b. to postpone action; defer.
30. hold on,
a. to keep a firm grip on something.
b. to keep going; continue.
c. to stop; halt (usu. used imperatively).
d. to keep a telephone connection open.
31. hold out,
a. to present; offer.
b. to continue to last.
c. to refuse to yield.
d. to withhold something expected or due.
32. hold over,
a. to keep for future consideration or action.
b. to keep beyond the arranged period: to hold a movie over for an extra week.
33. hold up,
a. to support; uphold.
b. to delay; bring to a stop.
c. to endure; persevere: I'm tired but holding up.
d. to present for attention; display.
e. to rob at gunpoint.
n.
34. an act of holding fast with the hand or other physical means; grasp; grip: a good hold on the rope.
35. something to hold a thing by; something to grasp, esp. for support.
36. something that holds fast or supports something else.
37. an order reserving something: to put a hold on a library book.
38. a controlling force or dominating influence: to have a hold on a person.
39. a wrestler's maneuver for seizing and controlling an opponent.
40. a pause or delay.
41. a prison cell.
43. a feature on a telephone that allows voice communication to be interrupted without breaking the connection.
Idioms:
1. get hold of,
a. to grasp; seize.
b. to communicate with by telephone.
2. on hold,
a. into a state of interruption or suspension.
b. into a state of being kept waiting incommunicado by a telephone hold.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English h(e)aldan, c. Old Frisian, Old Norse halda, Old High German haltan]
syn: See contain.

hold2

(hoʊld)

n.
1. the cargo space in the hull of a vessel, esp. between the lowermost deck and the bottom.
2. the cargo compartment of an aircraft.
[1585–95; variant of hole; compare Dutch hol hole, hold]
References in classic literature ?
It was on the first of May, in the year 1769, that I resigned my domestic happiness for a time, and left my family and peaceable habitation on the Yadkin River, in North-Carolina, to wander through the wilderness of America, in quest of the country of Kentucke, in company with John Finley, John Stewart, Joseph Holden, James Monay, and William Cool.
Nevertheless I am continually with thee; thou hast holden me by my right hand.
And right so he smote his father Arthur with his sword holden in both his hands, on the side of the head, that the sword pierced the helmet and the brain-pan, and therewithal Sir Mordred fell stark dead to the earth.
He came to her relief with a fixed despair of himself which made the interview unlike any other that could have been holden.
It is fair to remark that there was no prohibition against any pupil's entertaining himself with a slate or even with the ink (when there was any), but that it was not easy to pursue that branch of study in the winter season, on account of the little general shop in which the classes were holden - and which was also Mr.
And he picked up from the floor a wandering scrap of manuscript, on which I just caught the words 'after which Election duly holden the said Sibimet and Tabikat his wife may at their pleasure assume Imperial--' before, with a guilty look, he crumpled it up in his hand.
If the profoundest prophet could be holden to his words, and the hearer who is ready to sell all and join the crusade could have any certificate that tomorrow his prophet shall not unsay his testimony
Some retrospective perception of this came long afterward when I read his essays, and after I knew all of his poetry, and later yet when I read the 'Vicar of Wakefield'; but for the present my eyes were holden, as the eyes of a boy mostly are in the world of art.
Likewise, there were articles to carry, which required to be considered and discussed, and in reference to the adjustment and disposition of which, councils had to be holden by the Carrier and the senders: at which Boxer usually assisted, in short fits of the closest attention, and long fits of tearing round and round the assembled sages and barking himself hoarse.
stuff, or anything which may be named as holden of right to one's own
And the King caught him manly by the neck, both under him that all a long month after men might see how strongly the King had holden them by the throats.
There was a great bustle in Bishopsgate Street Within, as they drew up, and (it being a windy day) half-a-dozen men were tacking across the road under a press of paper, bearing gigantic announcements that a Public Meeting would be holden at one o'clock precisely, to take into consideration the propriety of petitioning Parliament in favour of the United Metropolitan Improved Hot Muffin and Crumpet Baking and Punctual Delivery Company, capital five millions, in five hundred thousand shares of ten pounds each; which sums were duly set forth in fat black figures of considerable size.