holding

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hold·ing

 (hōl′dĭng)
n.
1.
a. Land rented or leased from another.
b. often holdings Legally owned property, such as land, capital, or stocks.
2. holdings The collection of books and other reading materials at a library.
3. Law The part of a court opinion that announces how the law is being applied to the particular facts of the case and that may establish precedent for future similar cases.
4. Sports Illegal use of the arms, hands, body, or playing stick to obstruct the movements of an opponent.
adj.
1. Tending to impede or delay progress: a holding action.
2. Designed for usually short-term storage or retention: a holding tank; a holding cell.

holding

(ˈhəʊldɪŋ)
n
1. (Law) land held under a lease and used for agriculture or similar purposes
2. (Law) (often plural) property to which the holder has legal title, such as land, stocks, shares, and other investments
3. (Boxing) sport the obstruction of an opponent with the hands or arms, esp in boxing
adj
informal Austral in funds; having money

hold•ing

(ˈhoʊl dɪŋ)

n.
1. the act of one that holds.
2. a section of land leased or otherwise tenanted, esp. for agricultural purposes.
3. Often, holdings. legally owned property, as securities.
4. holdings, the collection of books, periodicals, and other materials in a library.
5. the illegal obstruction of an opponent, as in football, basketball, or ice hockey, by use of the hands, arms, or stick.
[1175–1225]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.holding - the act of retaining somethingholding - the act of retaining something  
possession, ownership - the act of having and controlling property
withholding - the act of holding back or keeping within your possession or control; "I resented his withholding permission"; "there were allegations of the withholding of evidence"
storage - the act of storing something
2.holding - something ownedholding - something owned; any tangible or intangible possession that is owned by someone; "that hat is my property"; "he is a man of property";
possession - anything owned or possessed
material possession, tangible possession - property or belongings that are tangible
worldly belongings, worldly goods, worldly possessions - all the property that someone possess; "he left all his worldly possessions to his daughter"
ratables, rateables - property that provides tax income for local governments
hereditament - any property (real or personal or mixed) that can be inherited
intellectual property - intangible property that is the result of creativity (such as patents or trademarks or copyrights)
community property - property and income belonging jointly to a married couple
personal estate, personal property, personalty, private property - movable property (as distinguished from real estate)
things - any movable possession (especially articles of clothing); "she packed her things and left"
immovable, real estate, real property, realty - property consisting of houses and land
commonage - property held in common
landholding - a holding in the form of land
salvage - property or goods saved from damage or destruction
shareholding - a holding in the form of shares of corporations
church property, spirituality, spiritualty - property or income owned by a church
lease, letting, rental - property that is leased or rented out or let
trade-in - an item of property that is given in part payment for a new one
public property - property owned by a government
wealth - property that has economic utility: a monetary value or an exchange value
estate - everything you own; all of your assets (whether real property or personal property) and liabilities
heirloom - (law) any property that is considered by law or custom as inseparable from an inheritance is inherited with that inheritance
stockholding, stockholdings - a specific number of stocks or shares owned; "sell holdings he has in corporations"
trust - something (as property) held by one party (the trustee) for the benefit of another (the beneficiary); "he is the beneficiary of a generous trust set up by his father"

holding

noun
Something, as land and assets, legally possessed.Often used in plural:
estate, possession (used in plural), property.
Translations

holding

[ˈhəʊldɪŋ]
A. N
1. (= land) → pequeña propiedad f, parcela f, chacra f (S. Cone) holdingsterrenos mpl
2. (Comm) → valores mpl en cartera
3. (= act) → tenencia f
B. CPD holding company N (Comm) → holding m
holding operation Noperación f de contención

holding

[ˈhəʊldɪŋ]
n
(= share) → parts fpl
to have a holding in sth → avoir des parts dans qch
(= farm) → exploitation f
adj (= delaying) [operation, action, tactic] → destiné(e) à retarder les chosesholding company nholding m

holding

n
(Fin, of shares) → Anteil m (→ in an +dat); the maximum holdingder maximal zulässige Anteil
(of books, paintings)Sammlung f(of von)
(of land)Landgut nt; a holding of 10 hectaresein Landgut von 10 Hektar

holding

:
holding company
nHolding(gesellschaft) f
holding operation
nprovisorische Maßnahme; (= damage limitation)Schadensbegrenzungsaktion f
holding pattern
n (Aviat) → Warteschleife f; (fig)Warteposition f

holding

[ˈhəʊldɪŋ] n (land) → podere m, tenuta
holdings → terre fpl, proprietà fpl terriere holdings npl (Comm) → azioni fpl, titoli mpl
References in periodicals archive ?
of Hemingway that clearly defines For Whom as a model for The Cry, as is clear in the following two descriptions of sexual intercourse (the first from Hemingway and the second from Bulosan): "For him it was a dark passage which led to nowhere, then to nowhere, then again to nowhere, once again to nowhere, always and forever to nowhere, heavy on the elbows in the earth to nowhere, dark and never any end to nowhere, hung on all time always to unknowing nowhere, this time and again for always to nowhere, now not to be borne once again always and to nowhere, now beyond all bearing up, up, up and into nowhere, suddenly, scaldingly, holdingly all nowhere gone and time absolutely still and they were both there, time having stopped and he felt the earth move out and away from under them" (159).
As the world moves for both of them, Hemingway shows that the experience changes Jordan's way of thinking: "suddenly, scaldingly, holdingly all nowhere [was] gone and time [was] absolutely still and they were both there, time having stopped and he felt the earth move out and away from under them" (159).
For him it was a dark passage which led to nowhere, then to nowhere, then again to nowhere, once again to nowhere, always and forever to nowhere, heavy on the elbows in the earth to nowhere, dark, never any end to nowhere, hung on all time always to unknowing nowhere, this time and again for always to nowhere, now not to be borne once again always and to nowhere, now beyond all bearing up, up, up and into nowhere, suddenly, scaldingly, holdingly all nowhere gone and time absolutely still and they were both there, time having stopped and he felt