holism


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ho·lism

 (hō′lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The theory that living matter or reality is made up of organic or unified wholes that are greater than the simple sum of their parts.
2. A holistic investigation or system of treatment.

ho′list n.

holism

(ˈhəʊlɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) any doctrine that a system may have properties over and above those of its parts and their organization
2. (Medicine) the treatment of any subject as a whole integrated system, esp, in medicine, the consideration of the complete person, physically and psychologically, in the treatment of a disease. See also alternative medicine
3. (Philosophy) philosophy one of a number of methodological theses holding that the significance of the parts can only be understood in terms of their contribution to the significance of the whole and that the latter must therefore be epistemologically prior. Compare reductionism, atomism2
[C20: from holo- + -ism]

ho•lism

(ˈhoʊ lɪz əm)

n.
1. the theory that whole entities have an existence other than as the mere sum of their parts.
2. an approach to healing or health care, often involving therapies outside the mainstream of medicine, in which isolated symptoms or conditions are considered secondary to one's total physical and psychological state.
[< Greek hól(os) whole + -ism]
ho′list, n.

holism

the theory that whole entities, as fundamental components of reality, have an existence other than as the mere sum of their parts. Cf. organicism.holist, n.holistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.holism - the theory that the parts of any whole cannot exist and cannot be understood except in their relation to the whole; "holism holds that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts"; "holistic theory has been applied to ecology and language and mental states"
theory - a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world; an organized system of accepted knowledge that applies in a variety of circumstances to explain a specific set of phenomena; "theories can incorporate facts and laws and tested hypotheses"; "true in fact and theory"
organicism - theory that the total organization of an organism rather than the functioning of individual organs is the determinant of life processes
configurationism, Gestalt psychology - (psychology) a theory of psychology that emphasizes the importance of configurational properties
atomist theory, atomistic theory, atomic theory, atomism - (chemistry) any theory in which all matter is composed of tiny discrete finite indivisible indestructible particles; "the ancient Greek philosophers Democritus and Epicurus held atomic theories of the universe"
Translations
holismo

holism

[ˈhəʊlɪzəm] nholisme m

holism

nHolismus m

holism

n holismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Among their topics are remarks from a lost engagement with the engaging ordinariness of Parkour, losing Bigfoot, flat claps and Dengue Fever: a story of ethnographies lost and found in India, losing students in a school ethnography: anthropology and the puzzle of holism, and finding lost things under the binds of a neglected thesis cover.
Abdul Latif Malik was of the view that no country could strengthen its economy without increasing its volume of exports, therefore government should not adhere to ad holism and artificial policies but chalk out long term policies keeping in view the ground realities.
Egalitarian holism is the conceptual framework that best embodies the mission of ecofeminism and provides for the livelihood and flourishing of all.
For being a thorough and completed health care system, TCM is based on the conceptions of 'holism' and 'individualization' that are aimed for reaching the 'harmony' between human and nature, as well as within the human body.
Holism is used when the learner reads together with the teacher or by the self to comprehend ideas (See Gunning, 2000).
(6,7) Within the polarities of these choices are knowledge forms with differing concepts of holism, (8-10) and the culture of complementary medicine appears to relate to the position of nature-human-machine synthesis.
The hero "Nick" in Hemingway's short stories grows up with the gradual formation of his ecological consciousness such as "respect for life," "rebuilding the ecological holism to nature" and "remembrance of nature." Their reverence to nature and being integrated in nature sets an example for us who are in the era of ecology.
Such consciousness would replace the Enlightenment dualist 'illusion' with a post-Enlightenment holism that 'fully integrated' humanity within the ecosphere.
He is interested in establishing via the plastic properties of paint quality as well as line, form and color placement, the condition of 'web connection' which is nirvana-istic holism, and the singularity of Enso/Zen/Void where order and chaos battle for supremacy, when the mind is uninhabited allowing the body its natural condition to be freeform expressive and creative.
Simmons proposes in this book that two major concepts out of contemporary quantum physics, namely, entanglement or relational holism and superposition or complementarity, could well serve as guiding metaphors for understanding a "perichoretic" relation between God and the world.
Finally, we have the methodological problems: holism or individualism?
Martin discusses the necessity of a "shift to holism" that would help cement a global social contract.