holism

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ho·lism

 (hō′lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The theory that living matter or reality is made up of organic or unified wholes that are greater than the simple sum of their parts.
2. A holistic investigation or system of treatment.

ho′list n.

holism

(ˈhəʊlɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) any doctrine that a system may have properties over and above those of its parts and their organization
2. (Medicine) the treatment of any subject as a whole integrated system, esp, in medicine, the consideration of the complete person, physically and psychologically, in the treatment of a disease. See also alternative medicine
3. (Philosophy) philosophy one of a number of methodological theses holding that the significance of the parts can only be understood in terms of their contribution to the significance of the whole and that the latter must therefore be epistemologically prior. Compare reductionism, atomism2
[C20: from holo- + -ism]

ho•lism

(ˈhoʊ lɪz əm)

n.
1. the theory that whole entities have an existence other than as the mere sum of their parts.
2. an approach to healing or health care, often involving therapies outside the mainstream of medicine, in which isolated symptoms or conditions are considered secondary to one's total physical and psychological state.
[< Greek hól(os) whole + -ism]
ho′list, n.

holism

the theory that whole entities, as fundamental components of reality, have an existence other than as the mere sum of their parts. Cf. organicism.holist, n.holistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.holism - the theory that the parts of any whole cannot exist and cannot be understood except in their relation to the whole; "holism holds that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts"; "holistic theory has been applied to ecology and language and mental states"
theory - a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world; an organized system of accepted knowledge that applies in a variety of circumstances to explain a specific set of phenomena; "theories can incorporate facts and laws and tested hypotheses"; "true in fact and theory"
organicism - theory that the total organization of an organism rather than the functioning of individual organs is the determinant of life processes
configurationism, Gestalt psychology - (psychology) a theory of psychology that emphasizes the importance of configurational properties
atomist theory, atomistic theory, atomic theory, atomism - (chemistry) any theory in which all matter is composed of tiny discrete finite indivisible indestructible particles; "the ancient Greek philosophers Democritus and Epicurus held atomic theories of the universe"
Translations
holismo

holism

[ˈhəʊlɪzəm] nholisme m

holism

nHolismus m

holism

n holismo
References in periodicals archive ?
More specifically, Holists prefer to process information in a "whole -to-part" sequence whereas Serialists favor a "part-to-whole" processing of information (Jonassen & Grabowski, 2012).
The holists support the thesis that the wholes are more than the sum of their parts because, by combining these parts new properties will result, belonging only to the whole and not to the parts.
Needless to say, those holists need to show that they can in effect accommodate compositionality, and thereafter the relevant literature has grown immensely.
Although the holism/non-holism distinction--as discussed in section three--is not itself a distinction concerning the kind of entities taken to be directly morally important, I think it is an uncontroversial claim that those who are referred to as holists (in this sense) in environmental ethics do take some natural whole(s) to possess direct moral importance.
Holists believe that how well someone's life goes has to be seen in terms of the life as a whole, and is not determined by the subject's well-being at particular times (in particular, it may be influenced by the overall shape of the life, as David Velleman has argued [Velleman 1991]).
However holists, argue that agents are superficial facets of structures and thus prioritize structure over agent.
Serialists versus holists: serialists prefer to learn in a sequential way, whereas holists prefer to learn in a hierarchical manner, i.
Property theorists can typically be described as either reductionists or holists.
While holists can also work within a schedule that devotes time to instruction, such practice cuts against their ideology.
At the same time, studying Lawrence alongside interwar clinical holists allows us to understand the campaign for person-centered medical reform not as a reactionary response to modernity but a complex phenomenon ambivalently enmeshed in processes of socio-cultural change.
The second error of holists may lie in their overextension of Heisenberg's Principle of Uncertainty and/or Goedel's Theorem which some of them use to imply that the physical and natural sciences can make no predictions about nature, and never could.