holt


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holt

 (hōlt)
n. Archaic
A wood or grove; a copse.

[Middle English, from Old English.]

holt

(həʊlt)
n
(Physical Geography) archaic or poetic a wood or wooded hill
[Old English holt; related to Old Norse holt, Old High German holz, Old Slavonic kladũ log, Greek klados twig]

holt

(həʊlt)
n
(Biology) the burrowed lair of an animal, esp an otter
[C16: a phonetic variant of hold2]

Holt

(həʊlt)
n
(Biography) Harold Edward. 1908–67, Australian statesman; prime minister (1966–67); believed drowned
References in classic literature ?
William Holt, a wealthy manufacturer of Chicago, was living temporarily in a little town of central New York, the name of which the writer's memory has not retained.
Holt was astonished--"dumfounded" is the word that he used in telling it--yet seems to have retained a certain intelligent curiosity.
I met the seal-hunter, Pete Holt, and agreed to be his boat-puller and to sign on any schooner he signed on.
Joe Vigy cashed my advance note, and Pete Holt treated, and I treated, and Joe Vigy treated, and other hunters treated.
Thomas Holt to go with me," said Miss Cornelia complacently.
Hum, hum—’our gallant navy’—hum, hum—’under our most excellent monarch’—ay, a good man enough, that King George, but bad advisers: hum, hum—’I beg to conclude with assurances of my perfect respect.’—hum, hum—’Andrew Holt. ‘—Andrew Holt, a very sensible, feeling man, this Mr.
Holt. The interests of this school are in general philosophy and the philosophy of the sciences, rather than in psychology; they have derived a strong impulsion from James, but have more interest than he had in logic and mathematics and the abstract part of philosophy.
when the soft wind "with his sweet breath inspired hath in every holt and heath the tender crops"; when the little birds make new songs, then "longen folk to go on pilgrimages, and palmers for to seeken strange lands, and especially from every shire's end of England, to Canterbury they wend."
"I want to go to the other side of Holt," he said, "and get my friend - get this gentleman away from here - get him home, if possible.
His exact words were: "Sir Thomas Holt hath taken a cleaver and stricken his cook upon the head, so that one side of the head fell upon one shoulder and the other side upon the other shoulder." The defendant was acquitted by instruction of the court, the learned judges holding that the words did not charge murder, for they did not affirm the death of the cook, that being only an inference.
In the north the Saracen's head of the Brocas and the scarlet fish of the De Roches were waving over a strong body of archers from Holt, Woolmer, and Harewood forests.
The couplet from Aeschylus which she prefixed to one of the chapters of 'Felix Holt' might stand at the outset of all her work: