homely

(redirected from homelier)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

homely

plain; unattractive: a homely mongrel; lacking refinement: a homely country boy
Not to be confused with:
homey – comfortably informal; cozy; homelike; warm and friendly: a homey cottage
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

home·ly

 (hōm′lē)
adj. home·li·er, home·li·est
1. Not attractive or good-looking: a homely child.
2. Lacking elegance or refinement: homely furniture.
3. Of a simple or unpretentious nature; plain: homely truths.
4. Characteristic of the home or of home life: homely skills.

home′li·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

homely

(ˈhəʊmlɪ)
adj, -lier or -liest
1. characteristic of or suited to the ordinary home; unpretentious
2. (of a person)
a. Brit warm and domesticated in manner or appearance
b. chiefly US and Canadian plain or ugly
ˈhomeliness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

home•ly

(ˈhoʊm li)

adj. -li•er, -li•est.
1. lacking in physical attractiveness; plain.
2. simple; unpretentious: homely food.
3. commonly seen or known; familiar.
[1300–50; Middle English homly]
home′li•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

homely

In American English, if you say that a person is homely, you mean that they are not attractive to look at.

He was presumably Caporelli's neighbor, this meek-looking, homely man in the tweed jacket.
A broad grin spread across his homely features.

You cannot use homely in this way in British English. If you want to say that someone is not attractive to look at, you say that they are plain.

...a plain plump girl with pigtails.

In British English, if you say that someone is homely, you mean that they behave kindly and in a simple, unsophisticated way.

He greeted us in his usual homely manner.
Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.homely - lacking in physical beauty or proportion; "a homely child"; "several of the buildings were downright homely"; "a plain girl with a freckled face"
unattractive - lacking beauty or charm; "as unattractive as most mining regions"
2.homely - having a feeling of home; cozy and comfortable; "the homely everyday atmosphere"; "a homey little inn"
comfortable, comfy - providing or experiencing physical well-being or relief (`comfy' is informal); "comfortable clothes"; "comfortable suburban houses"; "made himself comfortable in an armchair"; "the antihistamine made her feel more comfortable"; "are you comfortable?"; "feeling comfy now?"
3.homely - plain and unpretentious; "homely truths"; "letters to his son full of homely advice"; "homely fare"
plain - not elaborate or elaborated; simple; "plain food"; "stuck to the plain facts"; "a plain blue suit"; "a plain rectangular brick building"
4.homely - without artificial refinement or elegance; "plain homely furniture"; "homely manners"
inelegant - lacking in refinement or grace or good taste
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

homely

adjective
1. comfortable, welcoming, friendly, domestic, familiar, informal, cosy, comfy (informal), homespun, downhome (slang, chiefly U.S.), homelike, homy We try and provide a very homely atmosphere.
3. (U.S.) unattractive, plain, ugly, not striking, unprepossessing, not beautiful, no oil painting (informal), ill-favoured The man was homely and overweight.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

homely

adjective
1. Not handsome or beautiful:
Idioms: not much for looks, not much to look at, short on looks.
2. Of a plain and unsophisticated nature:
3. Of or relating to the family or household:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
بَسيطبَيتيغَيْر جَذّاب
domácídomáckýnehezký
enkelgrimhjemligjævnutiltrækkende
nem szépotthonias
heimilislegurófríîur
basit fakat hoşcana yakıncandançirkinsevimsiz

homely

[ˈhəʊmlɪ] ADJ (homelier (compar) (homeliest (superl)))
1. (= like home) [food] → casero; [atmosphere] → familiar; [advice] → prosaico
it's very homely hereaquí se está como en casa
2. (Brit) [woman] → sencillo
3. (US) (= unattractive) → poco atractivo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

homely

[ˈhəʊmli] adj
(= cosy) [room, atmosphere, place] → simple et accueillant(e)
(US) (= plain) → au physique plutôt ingrat
The man was homely and fat → L'homme avait un physique plutôt ingrat et était trop gros.home-made [ˌhəʊmˈmeɪd] adjfait(e) maisonhome-maker [ˈhəʊmlmeɪkər] n (woman)femme f d'intérieur; (man)homme m d'intérieurhome match nmatch m à domicilehome movie nvidéo f amateurhome nations npl (British) (= England, N. Ireland, Scotland & Wales) the home nations → les quatre nations fpl britanniqueshome news npldes nouvelles fpl du paysHome Office n (British)ministère m de l'Intérieur
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

homely

adj (+er)
person (Brit: = home-loving) → häuslich, hausbacken (pej); atmosphere, restaurantheimelig, gemütlich, behaglich; styleanspruchslos, hausbacken (pej); adviceeinfach
foodbürgerlich
(US: = plain) personunscheinbar; facereizlos
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

homely

[ˈhəʊmlɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (food, person) → semplice, alla buona; (atmosphere) → familiare, accogliente; (advice) → pratico/a (Am) (plain, person, features) → insignificante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

home

(həum) noun
1. the house, town, country etc where a person etc usually lives. I work in London but my home is in Bournemouth; When I retire, I'll make my home in Bournemouth; Africa is the home of the lion; We'll have to find a home for the kitten.
2. the place from which a person, thing etc comes originally. America is the home of jazz.
3. a place where children without parents, old people, people who are ill etc live and are looked after. an old folk's home; a nursing home.
4. a place where people stay while they are working. a nurses' home.
5. a house. Crumpy Construction build fine homes for fine people; He invited me round to his home.
adjective
1. of a person's home or family. home comforts.
2. of the country etc where a person lives. home produce.
3. (in football) playing or played on a team's own ground. the home team; a home game.
adverb
1. to a person's home. I'm going home now; Hallo – I'm home!
2. completely; to the place, position etc a thing is intended to be. He drove the nail home; Few of his punches went home; These photographs of the war brought home to me the suffering of the soldiers.
ˈhomeless noun plural, adjective
(people) without a place to live in. This charity was set up to help the homeless; homeless people.
ˈhomely adjective
1. simple but pleasant. homely food.
2. making a person feel he is at home. a homely atmosphere.
3. (American) (of a person) not attractive; ugly.
ˈhomeliness noun
ˈhoming adjective
1. (of pigeons etc) which (can) fly home when set free a long way from home.
2. able to take a missile etc to its target. These torpedoes have homing devices in their noses.
ˈhome-coming noun
1. the return home of a person (who has been away for some time). We had a party to celebrate his home-coming.
2. (American) an annual event held by a college, a university or high school for former students.
ˌhome-ˈgrown adjective
grown in one's own garden or in one's own country. These tomatoes are home-grown.
ˈhomeland noun
a person's native land. Immigrants often weep for their homeland.
ˌhome-ˈmade adjective
made by a person at home; not professionally made. home-made jam; home-made furniture.
home rule
the government of a country or part of a country by its own citizens.
ˈhomesick adjective
missing one's home. When the boy first went to boarding-school he was very homesick.
ˈhomesickness noun
ˈhomestead (-sted) noun
a house, especially a farm, with the land and other buildings (eg barns) which belong to it, especially in the United States, Australia etc.
home truth
a plain statement of something which is unpleasant but true (about a person, his behaviour etc) said directly to the person. It's time someone told him a few home truths.
ˈhomeward adjective
going home. his homeward journey.
ˈhomeward(s) adverb
towards home. his journey homeward; He journeyed homewards.
ˈhomework noun
work or study done at home, especially by a school pupil. Finish your homework!
at home
1. in one's home. I'm afraid he's not at home.
2. (in football etc) in one's own ground. The team is playing at home today.
be/feel at home
to feel as relaxed as one does in one's own home or in a place or situation one knows well. I always feel at home in France; He's quite at home with cows – he used to live on a farm.
home in on
to move towards (a target etc). The missile is designed to home in on aircraft.
leave home
1. to leave one's house. I usually leave home at 7.30 a.m.
2. to leave one's home to go and live somewhere else. He left home at the age of fifteen to get a job in Australia.
make oneself at home
to make oneself as comfortable and relaxed as one would at home. Make yourself at home!
nothing to write home about
not very good. The concert was nothing to write home about.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
hostile to all such truthfulness-statues, In every desert homelier than at temples, With cattish wantonness, Through every window leaping Quickly into chances, Every wild forest a-sniffing, Greedily-longingly, sniffing, That thou, in wild forests,
And thorny crown of this sad conception was that she whom he really did prefer in a cursory way to the rest, she who knew herself to be more impassioned in nature, cleverer, more beautiful than they, was in the eyes of propriety far less worthy of him than the homelier ones whom he ignored.
That is, I did not attempt anything like his tales in kind; they must have seemed too hopelessly far away in taste and time, but I studied his verse, and imitated a stanza which I found in some of his things and had not found elsewhere; I rejoiced in the freshness and sweetness of his diction, and though I felt that his structure was obsolete, there was in his wording something homelier and heartier than the imported analogues that had taken the place of the phrases he used.
From his speech she knew he was not of the cities, and she seemed to sense the wider, homelier air of large spaces.
Not content with just booking rooms, national team general manager Oliver Bierhoff arranged for rebuilding work to be carried out, to give the place a homelier feel.
I loved that it seemed to flow out of Portland's homelier past, when it was a timber town, a little rough, and the river was the center of everything--of commerce as well as society (dividing the upscale Westside of Portland from the working-class east).
The rug in the centre softens the look and again moves the room away from boring office to a softer, homelier place.
Taubman, however, focuses not only on the strangeness of Muratova's films but also on their humane concern with the ordinary, the earthbound, and thus renders Muratova a homelier and more sympathetic artist than she might at first appear.
But they are unlikely to have the convincing power of Nestle's homelier prose for most readers: his musings are those of a writer free to travel, to roam the woods in search of fungi and wild pigs, and to eat regularly at Chez Panisse.
In confidential moments she preferred the homelier themes, and would have enjoyed best of all being tender and gay about the coal cellar, or reticent and brave about the leak in the boiler; but she was ready to deal with anything as long as it was a fact.
Their surging lyricism commandingly evokes the sight, smells, and sounds of Africa's wild places, which the poet had known for more than sixty years of living there, and had come to sense so keenly: Even the bush, dried up and shrunken, got closer and homelier, and the dense steam that rose then from the red earth carried the sharp scent of the khaki herb, the tough African mass of the prickly wag-'n-bietjie bushes, of the cruel big cactuses and the fleshy little ones, of the strong scent of the wild mahalula fruit; and a damp darkness curled up from among the bushes, and out of the fullness of joy, Africa was on the verge of tears then ...
This culture has blossomed since 1980, introducing a new and quite distinct system of values and practices, completing a radical break with the homelier tone of earlier treatises, over many decades, on the "art of administration," typically compilations of addresses by retired university presidents.